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  1. #1
    ROG Member Array dolfan058 PC Specs
    dolfan058 PC Specs
    MotherboardASUS ROG Maximus VIII Hero Alpha
    Processori7-6700K
    Memory (part number)CMK32GX4M2B3200C16 (total of 64 GB RAM)
    Graphics Card #1ASUS ROG Strix 1080 OC
    MonitorASUS ROG PG348Q
    Storage #1Samsung 950 PRO 512 GB
    Storage #2Sandisk Ultra II 960 GB
    CPU CoolerCorsair H115i
    CaseCorsair Air 540
    Power SupplyCorsair HX850i
    Keyboard Logitech G910 Orion Spark
    Mouse Logiterch G502
    Headset Sennheiser RS 180
    Mouse Pad Corsair Gaming MM300
    Headset/Speakers Klipsch Promedia 2.1
    OS Windows 10 Pro
    Network RouterASUS RT-AC87U
    Accessory #1 Blue Yeti USB Microphone - Silver
    Accessory #2 Logitech HD Pro Webcam C920

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    Convert audio port to second headphone jack

    I have an ASUS Maximus BIII Hero Alpha. Is it possible to convert one of the audio ports in the back to essentially a second headphone jack? Let me know if you need more detail.

    Thank you!*

  2. #2
    ROG Guru: Black Belt Array Korth PC Specs
    Korth PC Specs
    MotherboardASUS X99 R5E (BIOS2101/1902)
    ProcessorHaswell-EP E5-1680-3 SR20H/R2 (4.4GHz)
    Memory (part number)Vengeance LPX 4x8GB SS DDR4-3000 (CMK32GX4M4C3000C15)
    Graphics Card #1NVIDIA Quadro GP100GL/16GB, 16xPCIe3, NVLink1 (SLI-HB)
    Graphics Card #2NVIDIA Quadro GP100GL/16GB, 16xPCIe3, NVLink1 (SLI-HB)
    Sound CardJDS Labs O2+ODAC (RevB), USB2 UAC1
    MonitorASUS PG278Q
    Storage #1Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SSDs, 4xSATA3 RAID0
    Storage #2Comay BladeDrive E28 3200GB SSD, 8xPCIe2
    CPU CoolerRaijintek NEMESIS/TISIS, AS5, 2xNH-A14
    CaseObsidian 750D (original), 6xNH-A14
    Power SupplyZalman/FSP ZM1250 Platinum
    Headset Pilot P51 PTT *modded*
    OS Arch, Gentoo, Win7x64, Win10x64
    Network RouterActiontec T3200M VDSL2 Gateway
    Accessory #1 TP-Link AC1900 Archer T9E, 1xPCIe
    Accessory #2 ASUS/Infineon SLB9635 TPM (TT1.2/FW3.19)
    Accessory #3 ASUS OC Panel I (FW0501)
    Korth's Avatar
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    The heart of "SupremeFX" is an ASUS-programmed Realtek ALC1150 10-Channel HD Audio Codec. The ALC1150 admittedly has a bit of tainted rep with gamers and audiophiles - because it's never going to outperform a proper dedicated sound card - but it has truly excellent specs, it's fairly robust, it's cheap (in bulk, anyhow), it's well supported (if you're an OEM, anyhow), it's highly customizable and it's surprisingly versatile. ALC1150 chips are used in USB gizmos, low-cost PC audio cards, high-cost PC motherboards, "professional" instruments and audio consoles, and a wide variety of consumer appliances. Hardware specs include:
    • Intel HD Audio support (PCM up to 32k/44.1k/48k/88.2k/96k/192kHz sampling rates and 16-/20-/24-bit resolutions), legacy analog support, legacy (Realtek) codec support
    • 10 output DACs (primary 8-channel 7.1 Surround playback at 115dB/96dB SNR, secondary 2-channel independent Stereo "multiple streaming" playback at 110dB/93dB SNR)
    • 2 input ADCs (Stereo mic at 104dB SNR with software-controlled Acoustic Echo Cancellation, Beam Forming, Noise Suppression)
    • 8 retaskable analog I/O jacks (with three jack sense/detection pins, three analog output amplifiers, four analog input amplifiers, "anti-pop" mode output support)
    • Full Rate Lossless Content Protection DRM firmware (for I2S, streaming, software media, CD, DVD, HD-DVD, and Blu-Ray playback)
    • Windows-optimized (Vista/7/8/10) software-controlled power status monitor and controls (with 0.75dB volume stepping, +10dB/+20dB/+30dB gain boost, Dolby TrueHD and LPCM emulation)
    • 48-pin QFN "Green" package with 1.5V/2.3V/3.0V/3.3V/3.8V/5.0V electrical interfaces, full Intel Low-Power ECR compliance, integrated whole-package LDO, HD Audio Link, DTS, optical/SPDIF, I2S bus, 2 GPIO pins

    "ROG Audio" (the precursor to "SupremeFX Audio") was basically just an ASUS-programmed ALC1150. The ASUS implementation was largely uninspired (copied straight off the ALC1150 datasheets), many ROG "innovations" (like PCB audio trace shielding, PCB layer isolation between channels, package EMI/RFI cage, "audio-grade" Nichicon filter capacitors, etc) strictly adhered Realtek's general and specific recommendations/suggestions for using this part. Other ROG "innovations" (like Sonic SenseAmp, Sonic Studio, Sonic Radar, etc) were primarily software-based tools which emphasized ALC1150 hardware capabilities. ASUS apparently linked the ALC1150 to/through the ROG Chip (on at least some boards), and apparently for no reason other to prevent non-ASUS software from successfully reflashing the ALC1150 firmware. I haven't personally confirmed this.

    "SupremeFX" is more than "ROG Audio", ASUS added some more discrete hardware parts to extend ALC1150 capabilities. Most notably a 2Vrms stereo headphone amplifier circuit (an ESS 9023P "Sabre" 24-bit stereo DAC driving a pair of TI RC4580 audio op-amps), an NEC UD2-4 5NU signal relay to strengthen "de-pop" (although the ALC1150 itself supports a limited "anti-pop" mode), and a dedicated clock. This all adds up to a cleaner, crisper, richer, and more "natural" (or, alternately, less "artificial") audio output - on the dedicated 2-channel (stereo) front-panel headphone audio output, anyhow.

    Note that "ASUS-programmed" means ASUS designed the firmware and parameter presets/boundaries encoded into their ALC1150s. Realtek provides tools to their OEM customers - ASUS, Gigabyte, MSI, etc. My experience with "ASUS-programmed" ALC1150s is that ASUS primarily emphasizes built-in features and functionality and compatibility, while emphasis on raw performance or quality is secondary (and you just can't have it all when there's tradeoffs).

    An answer to your question:

    The ALC1150 audio chip supports jack restasking (with certain limits, although it could easily do exactly what you want) - but it would need different software and/or it would need different firmware - and if your ASUS-provided stuff doesn't do it (yet) then I doubt it ever will. Also note that the rear-panel jacks wouldn't benefit from circuitry hardwired into the front-panel jacks.
    Last edited by Korth; 01-01-2017 at 02:26 AM.

  3. #3
    ROG Enthusiast Array w4tch0 PC Specs
    w4tch0 PC Specs
    MotherboardMaximus VIII Hero
    ProcessorIntel Core i7-6700K @ 4.5GHz
    Memory (part number)CMK16GX4M2B3000C15
    Graphics Card #1MSI GTX 1080 Gaming X 8GB
    MonitorBenq XL2411, Eizo FS2333
    Storage #1Samsung 850 Pro 256GB
    Storage #2Crucial MX200 512GB
    CPU CoolerNoctua NH-D15S
    CaseFractal Design Define R5
    Power SupplyEVGA Supernova 750 G2
    Keyboard Logitech G710+
    Mouse Zowie FK1
    Headset Audio-technica ADG1
    Headset/Speakers Kurzweil KS-40A
    OS Windows 10 Pro 64bit build 1607
    Network RouterAsus RT-N66U

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    I used to do this on my old Maximus V Gene (it was possible to re-task the other jack ports in the back to a "front stereo" output so I could have both my headphones and speakers plugged in at the same time in the back). Unfortunately, this port re-task flexibility does not seem to be available in the Maximus VIII hero audio driver. Only the front panel "Mic in" seems to have the possibility to re-task to "Front speakers out" but at that point you might as well use the front panel headphone jack, eh?

    I suspect it is because of the way how ASUS implemented the headphone AMP that is present on this mobo ("hardwired" to only work with the front panel headphone jack). //edit: And from what I read in above post from Korth, I suspect correctly.
    Last edited by w4tch0; 01-01-2017 at 02:59 AM.

  4. #4
    ROG Guru: Black Belt Array Korth PC Specs
    Korth PC Specs
    MotherboardASUS X99 R5E (BIOS2101/1902)
    ProcessorHaswell-EP E5-1680-3 SR20H/R2 (4.4GHz)
    Memory (part number)Vengeance LPX 4x8GB SS DDR4-3000 (CMK32GX4M4C3000C15)
    Graphics Card #1NVIDIA Quadro GP100GL/16GB, 16xPCIe3, NVLink1 (SLI-HB)
    Graphics Card #2NVIDIA Quadro GP100GL/16GB, 16xPCIe3, NVLink1 (SLI-HB)
    Sound CardJDS Labs O2+ODAC (RevB), USB2 UAC1
    MonitorASUS PG278Q
    Storage #1Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SSDs, 4xSATA3 RAID0
    Storage #2Comay BladeDrive E28 3200GB SSD, 8xPCIe2
    CPU CoolerRaijintek NEMESIS/TISIS, AS5, 2xNH-A14
    CaseObsidian 750D (original), 6xNH-A14
    Power SupplyZalman/FSP ZM1250 Platinum
    Headset Pilot P51 PTT *modded*
    OS Arch, Gentoo, Win7x64, Win10x64
    Network RouterActiontec T3200M VDSL2 Gateway
    Accessory #1 TP-Link AC1900 Archer T9E, 1xPCIe
    Accessory #2 ASUS/Infineon SLB9635 TPM (TT1.2/FW3.19)
    Accessory #3 ASUS OC Panel I (FW0501)
    Korth's Avatar
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    Mar 2015
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    I've reprogrammed ALC1150 parts (and/or their drivers) before to "unlock" the full Dolby feature set, to alter a few specific performance parameters more to my preferences, and to circumvent Realtek's DRM firmware for <ahem> research and educational purposes. I've been able to run modded ALC1150 firmwares/drivers/widgets on an ECS Z170 motherboard and several different SuperMicro Z170 motherboards, but I've never been able to get it working on any of the ASUS, ASUS/ROG, or MSI motherboards I tried. The ALC1150 itself lacks any sort of dedicated codelock feature, but there's always ways for motherboard manufacturers to exert control over exactly how it is (and is not) used, typically by embedding it underneath a dedicated (proprietary) ASIC/firmware platform.

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