Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23
  1. #1
    ROG Enthusiast Array adamr PC Specs
    adamr PC Specs
    MotherboardAsus Maximus XI Formula
    Processori9 9900K 5Ghz - 1.28V
    Memory (part number)32GB GSkill RGB Trident Z
    Graphics Card #1Asus Geforce GTX 2080Ti OC
    MonitorAsus 34" ROG Swift PG348G
    Storage #1Samsung SSD 970 PRO 512GB
    Storage #2Samsung SSD 850 EVO 1TB
    CPU CoolerCorsair H115i Platinum
    CasePhanteks Evolv X
    Power SupplyCorsair AX1200i
    Keyboard Asus Claymore
    Mouse Razer Chroma Mamba
    Mouse Pad Corsair Big a55 Mat
    Headset/Speakers Logitech Z5500 5.1
    OS Windows 10 Pro
    Network RouterAmplifi
    adamr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Reputation
    10
    Posts
    57

    Anyone with Haswell E and LED vengeance DDR4 3000+ memory

    Anyone else have/had issues with a Haswell processor and the new led vengeance DDR4 ram. I'm getting random BSODs. Are there specific settings people are using to get these to work properly?

    I have 4x8gig sticks at 3000mhz*

  2. #2
    ROG Member Array
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Reputation
    10
    Posts
    11

    Quote Originally Posted by adamr View Post
    Anyone else have/had issues with a Haswell processor and the new led vengeance DDR4 ram. I'm getting random BSODs. Are there specific settings people are using to get these to work properly?

    I have 4x8gig sticks at 3000mhz*
    I have tried corsair vangeance led 3466 mhz on intel 6950X and Asus rampage edition 10 and i couldn't go over 3000Mhz (same problem as you said). Now i have gskill ripjaws V 3200mhz cl14 and work perfectly. I think there are some compatibility problem wirh corsair ram.
    Last edited by deltacobra; 01-22-2017 at 04:17 PM.

  3. #3
    ROG Guru: Black Belt Array Korth PC Specs
    Korth PC Specs
    MotherboardASUS X99 R5E (BIOS2101/1902)
    ProcessorHaswell-EP E5-1680-3 SR20H/R2 (4.4GHz)
    Memory (part number)Vengeance LPX 4x8GB SS DDR4-3000 (CMK32GX4M4C3000C15)
    Graphics Card #1NVIDIA Quadro GP100GL/16GB, 16xPCIe3, NVLink1 (SLI-HB)
    Graphics Card #2NVIDIA Quadro GP100GL/16GB, 16xPCIe3, NVLink1 (SLI-HB)
    Sound CardJDS Labs O2+ODAC (RevB), USB2 UAC1
    MonitorASUS PG278Q
    Storage #1Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SSDs, 4xSATA3 RAID0
    Storage #2Comay BladeDrive E28 3200GB SSD, 8xPCIe2
    CPU CoolerRaijintek NEMESIS/TISIS, AS5, 2xNH-A14
    CaseObsidian 750D (original), 6xNH-A14
    Power SupplyZalman/FSP ZM1250 Platinum
    Headset Pilot P51 PTT *modded*
    OS Arch, Gentoo, Win7x64, Win10x64
    Network RouterActiontec T3200M VDSL2 Gateway
    Accessory #1 TP-Link AC1900 Archer T9E, 1xPCIe
    Accessory #2 ASUS/Infineon SLB9635 TPM (TT1.2/FW3.19)
    Accessory #3 ASUS OC Panel I (FW0501)
    Korth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Reputation
    152
    Posts
    2,719

    The iMCs built into your Haswell-E i7-5960X will natively support up to DDR4-2133. The iMCs built into your Broadwell-E i7-6950X will natively support up to DDR4-2400.
    These are currently the fastest JEDEC DDR4 standards, and they're all the Intel parts (processor and chipset/PCH) are officially rated to support. Anything slower is a defect or a misconfiguration, it should run at rated spec or it should be replaced/repaired. Anything faster is a memory overclock, it's running overspec, there are no promises and no guarantees. 32GB of DDR4-3000 (or faster) is still considered somewhat extreme.

    Specs for the R5E show support for up to 64GB DDR4-3300. Specs for the R5E10 show support for up to 128GB DDR4-3333.
    ASUS/ROG has overengineered and overkilled everything they can on these mobos to provide these capabilities. I'm guessing they've even binned their bulk Intel chipset (PCH) parts so that they can use only the "best" ones in these flagship mobos. And I'm sure they've tested extensively with every DDR4 part they could obtain because they want to proudly advertise how fast and awesome their mobos are, to set records, and to aggressively outsell competitors in the gaming/enthusiast/overclocker "niche" market. Many people have reported running even faster DDR4 on these mobos. But these ASUS/ROG specs are only "official" in the sense that they're the upper limit on what ASUS/ROG feels confident about promising, they're not a real guarantee that every DDR4-3000 kit will actually work on every mobo for every customer.

    Corsair and G.Skill do not actually manufacture DDR4 silicon - they use whatever Hynix, Samsung, or Micron silicon they can get which meets their spec. They purchase it in binned bulk and re-bin it themselves, always culling the "best" bits aside to use in their fastest "extreme" DDR4 products. And they always have to balance price and availability, charging as much they think people will pay, selling it while it can still command highest premiums, while also having enough stock on hand to supply demand. They couple these DDR4 memories with (DIMM-embedded) memory address controllers which are binned and re-binned in similar fashion.
    They do manufacture the actual DIMM PCBs, using "optimized" signal paths and thicker copper weights and buffers/caches and added components (like decoupling caps) to reduce latencies. They're fiercely competitive about establishing their brands as the fastest DDR4 available, and charging the most they can get for it - but they can only sell what they're able to buy. Silicon fab process yields are always improving, each new product batch is slightly more refined than its predecessors, and incremental performance increases gradually do add up over time, so DDR4 memory just keeps on getting faster and faster. But Intel and JEDEC have not (yet) caught up, they're far more interested in realistically increasing overall statistical performances/yields for their mass-produced deployments (improving their products) than they are in supporting quirky cherry-picked 1-in-a-million parts which are capable of running much faster.

    Some processors have "better" silicon than others. Some have stronger iMCs and UnCore/SysAgent circuit blocks than others (and respond differently to changes in voltages to these subcomponents than others). Almost every processor can be overclocked to some extent, and almost every processor can run faster than DDR4-2133/-2400 memory speeds. But you can't really compare one processor on one motherboard running one memory kit against another - every single silicon part is unique (and full of unique flaws), components and settings which work best on one platform will not work best on any other, components and settings which work for one guy won't necessarily work for another, overclocking is about pushing the limits and it's as much art as science.

    Some general rules of thumb for X99 DDR4:

    • Always get a proper factory-matched quad-channel kit. Extreme DDR4 is already finicky stuff. Mixed or mismatched kits have multiple (even conflicting) timings and incompatible "guard band" tolerances. Yes you might be able to get them all overclocked together, but you're more likely going to struggle with getting them to work together at all.
    • Don't exceed the "fastest" DDR4 supported by your mobo. You might be able to break new records, but you're more likely just going to waste money paying for extreme DDR4 performance which can't be realized.
    • The primary bottleneck on DDR4 speed is your X99 processor. Some "above average" procs can overclock, some "above average" procs can run superfast memory, few "above average" procs can simultaneously overclock everything all across the board, most "above average" procs have one strength and several weaknesses. And not all procs are "above average" - the vast majority are simply "average" and (by definition) there's just as many "below average" procs as there are "above average" ones.
    • Populating all the DIMM banks on your mobo will put more strain on the iMCs. There's more capacity, more ranks, more density, more signal latencies, more chances for things to go wrong, less chance of every single component and subcomponent being capable of achieving or sustaining extreme performance thresholds. The fastest possible DDR4 performance will adhere strictly to Intel spec: a matched kit of four single-sided DIMMs, for a Haswell-E on an R5E/R5E10 this would ideally be 4x16GB SS DDR4-3300/-3333+. Those fancy heatspreaders and LEDs almost always hide double-sided DIMMs: twice the number of DDR4 chips (each with half the density) on each stick, twice the latency (in worst-case situations) to address two memory "ranks", and about twice the profits from the perspective of the memory manufacturer.
    • Don't expect the factory-programmed profile on your extreme DDR4 to actually work "out of the box". You might have to manually tweak timings and settings. And you'll probably have to (reluctantly) bump your VCCIO/SA voltages in BIOS (this is almost a certainty when using the ASUS OC Socket vs the proc's FIVRs).
    Last edited by Korth; 01-22-2017 at 10:24 PM.

  4. #4
    ROG Guru: Brown Belt Array Brighttail PC Specs
    Brighttail PC Specs
    Laptop (Model)Asus G751JT
    MotherboardAsus x299 Rampage VI Extreme
    ProcessorIntel i9-7900x
    Memory (part number)Corsair Dominator Platinum SE 3200Mhz 4x8
    Graphics Card #1MSI GTX 1080TI
    MonitorAcer XB321HK (4k,IPS,G-sync)
    Storage #1Intel 900p (Boot) 2xSM961 (RAID 0) Games
    Storage #2Samsung 850 Pro 512GB - WD Black 4TB
    CPU CoolerCustom Water Cool
    CasePhanteks Enthoo Elite
    Power SupplyCorsair AX 1200i
    Keyboard Corsair Platinum 95
    Mouse Asus SPATHA
    Mouse Pad Corsair MM800
    Headset/Speakers Kanyo Y5
    OS Windows 10 64 bit
    Accessory #1 2 x Alphacool Full Copper Radiator 420mm/280mm
    Accessory #2 Monsoon MMRS reservoir w/ 2 x D5 Vario Pump
    Accessory #3 Monsoon Free Center Compression Fittings

    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Reputation
    33
    Posts
    1,336

    Quote Originally Posted by Korth View Post
    The iMCs built into your Haswell-E i7-5960X will natively support up to DDR4-2133. The iMCs built into your Broadwell-E i7-6950X will natively support up to DDR4-2400.
    These are currently the fastest JEDEC DDR4 standards, and they're all the Intel parts (processor and chipset/PCH) are officially rated to support. Anything slower is a defect or a misconfiguration, it should run at rated spec or it should be replaced/repaired. Anything faster is a memory overclock, it's running overspec, there are no promises and no guarantees. 32GB of DDR4-3000 (or faster) is still considered somewhat extreme.

    Specs for the R5E show support for up to 64GB DDR4-3300. Specs for the R5E10 show support for up to 128GB DDR4-3333.
    ASUS/ROG has overengineered and overkilled everything they can on these mobos to provide these capabilities. I'm guessing they've even binned their bulk Intel chipset (PCH) parts so that they can use only the "best" ones in these flagship mobos. And I'm sure they've tested extensively with every DDR4 part they could obtain because they want to proudly advertise how fast and awesome their mobos are, to set records, and to aggressively outsell competitors in the gaming/enthusiast/overclocker "niche" market. Many people have reported running even faster DDR4 on these mobos. But these ASUS/ROG specs are only "official" in the sense that they're the upper limit on what ASUS/ROG feels confident about promising, they're not a real guarantee that every DDR4-3000 kit will actually work on every mobo for every customer.

    Corsair and G.Skill do not actually manufacture DDR4 silicon - they use whatever Hynix, Samsung, or Micron silicon they can get which meets their spec. They purchase it in binned bulk and re-bin it themselves, always culling the "best" bits aside to use in their fastest "extreme" DDR4 products. And they always have to balance price and availability, charging as much they think people will pay, selling it while it can still command highest premiums, while also having enough stock on hand to supply demand. They couple these DDR4 memories with (DIMM-embedded) memory address controllers which are binned and re-binned in similar fashion.
    They do manufacture the actual DIMM PCBs, using "optimized" signal paths and thicker copper weights and buffers/caches and added components (like decoupling caps) to reduce latencies. They're fiercely competitive about establishing their brands as the fastest DDR4 available, and charging the most they can get for it - but they can only sell what they're able to buy. Silicon fab process yields are always improving, each new product batch is slightly more refined than its predecessors, and incremental performance increases gradually do add up over time, so DDR4 memory just keeps on getting faster and faster. But Intel and JEDEC have not (yet) caught up, they're far more interested in realistically increasing overall statistical performances/yields for their mass-produced deployments (improving their products) than they are in supporting quirky cherry-picked 1-in-a-million parts which are capable of running much faster.

    Some processors have "better" silicon than others. Some have stronger iMCs and UnCore/SysAgent circuit blocks than others (and respond differently to changes in voltages to these subcomponents than others). Almost every processor can be overclocked to some extent, and almost every processor can run faster than DDR4-2133/-2400 memory speeds. But you can't really compare one processor on one motherboard running one memory kit against another - every single silicon part is unique (and full of unique flaws), components and settings which work best on one platform will not work best on any other, components and settings which work for one guy won't necessarily work for another, overclocking is about pushing the limits and it's as much art as science.

    Some general rules of thumb for X99 DDR4:

    • Always get a proper factory-matched quad-channel kit. Extreme DDR4 is already finicky stuff. Mixed or mismatched kits have multiple (even conflicting) timings and incompatible "guard band" tolerances. Yes you might be able to get them all overclocked together, but you're more likely going to struggle with getting them to work together at all.
    • Don't exceed the "fastest" DDR4 supported by your mobo. You might be able to break new records, but you're more likely just going to waste money paying for extreme DDR4 performance which can't be realized.
    • The primary bottleneck on DDR4 speed is your X99 processor. Some "above average" procs can overclock, some "above average" procs can run superfast memory, few "above average" procs can simultaneously overclock everything all across the board, most "above average" procs have one strength and several weaknesses. And not all procs are "above average" - the vast majority are simply "average" and (by definition) there's just as many "below average" procs as there are "above average" ones.
    • Populating all the DIMM banks on your mobo will put more strain on the iMCs. There's more capacity, more ranks, more density, more signal latencies, more chances for things to go wrong, less chance of every single component and subcomponent being capable of achieving or sustaining extreme performance thresholds. The fastest possible DDR4 performance will adhere strictly to Intel spec: a matched kit of four single-sided DIMMs, for a Haswell-E on an R5E/R5E10 this would ideally be 4x16GB SS DDR4-3300/-3333+. Those fancy heatspreaders and LEDs almost always hide double-sided DIMMs: twice the number of DDR4 chips (each with half the density) on each stick, twice the latency (in worst-case situations) to address two memory "ranks", and about twice the profits from the perspective of the memory manufacturer.
    • Don't expect the factory-programmed profile on your extreme DDR4 to actually work "out of the box". You might have to manually tweak timings and settings. And you'll probably have to (reluctantly) bump your VCCIO/SA voltages in BIOS (this is almost a certainty when using the ASUS OC Socket vs the proc's FIVRs).
    I have to say this is by far one of the best explanations on this issue I have seen out there. Very well done. I have an RV5E10 motherboard and some of the new Corsair Dominator Platinum Special Edition Blackout 32GB (4x8) 3200MHz RAM. It came out after the RV5E10 motherboard, so I highly doubt Asus had a sample of these to test with. I was really hoping for plug n play but I couldn't get them stable with the 802 version of BIOS, having to up the voltage to 1.38v which wasn't so bad. Thankfully under the 901 version of BIOS, I could go back to the standard XMP profile with 1.35v. Unfortunately with the two latest BIOS versions I'm back to where I have been originally.

    I have to admit I have seen articles about bumping VCCIO/System Agent voltages up but have always been a bit fearful to do so. So I'm holding at version 901 with a good overclock on my i7-5930k at 4.4Ghz running at 1.33v. I'm happy but I would love to learn a bit more about the VCCIO/SA voltages. Sadly I must be learning deficient because the articles I have read on here I'm not able to fully grasp it all.

    Any suggestions? I only ask because Corsair claims that this RAM has been tested and can over clock to up to 3600MHz. I'm assuming that was done on the z170 which can handle those speeds much better than the x99 chipset. Still i would like to play around and see if I might be able to get 3400Mhz out of it, but I want to be safe about it. Just setting the BIOS from 3200 to 3400 is an instant no POST. I am comfy in moving the volts up to 1.4v on the RAM but I think I need to at least work with the VCCIO/SA to have a chance. At the very least I would like to have a little help in getting the RAM stable in the most current version of the BIOS which is 1501. So any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

    *EDIT* Just to give an idea what I'm looking at. My System Agent is set currently at 1.25v So if I read Raja's OC guide correctly, VCCIO should be set at .05 lower than the SA or at 1.20v Which should help stabilize the RAM. He also said that the System agent shouldn't go higher than 1.3 so that would leave the VCCIO at 1.25 max. This about right?

    *EDIT 2* SA is no problem at 1.25 but VCCIO goes purple warning at anything over 1.15 so I haven't pushed it above that. I've pretty much given up on RAM speeds over 3200MHz which is fine but on the 1502 BIOS I can't get stable XMP speeds 14-16-16-36 T1. Sadly it seems that 1502 just can't get as stable as 901.
    Last edited by Brighttail; 01-22-2017 at 11:37 PM.
    Panteks Enthoo Elite / Asus x299 Rampage VI Extreme / Intel I9-7900X / Corsair Dominator RGB 3200MHz
    MSI GTX 1080 TI / 2x Intel 900p / Samsung 970 Pro 512GB
    Samsung 850 PRO 512GB / Western Digital Gold 8TB HD
    Corsair AX 1200i / Corsair Platinum K95 / Asus Chakram
    Acer XB321HK 4k, IPS, G-sync Monitor / Water Cooled / Asus G571JT Laptop

  5. #5
    ROG Guru: Black Belt Array Korth PC Specs
    Korth PC Specs
    MotherboardASUS X99 R5E (BIOS2101/1902)
    ProcessorHaswell-EP E5-1680-3 SR20H/R2 (4.4GHz)
    Memory (part number)Vengeance LPX 4x8GB SS DDR4-3000 (CMK32GX4M4C3000C15)
    Graphics Card #1NVIDIA Quadro GP100GL/16GB, 16xPCIe3, NVLink1 (SLI-HB)
    Graphics Card #2NVIDIA Quadro GP100GL/16GB, 16xPCIe3, NVLink1 (SLI-HB)
    Sound CardJDS Labs O2+ODAC (RevB), USB2 UAC1
    MonitorASUS PG278Q
    Storage #1Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SSDs, 4xSATA3 RAID0
    Storage #2Comay BladeDrive E28 3200GB SSD, 8xPCIe2
    CPU CoolerRaijintek NEMESIS/TISIS, AS5, 2xNH-A14
    CaseObsidian 750D (original), 6xNH-A14
    Power SupplyZalman/FSP ZM1250 Platinum
    Headset Pilot P51 PTT *modded*
    OS Arch, Gentoo, Win7x64, Win10x64
    Network RouterActiontec T3200M VDSL2 Gateway
    Accessory #1 TP-Link AC1900 Archer T9E, 1xPCIe
    Accessory #2 ASUS/Infineon SLB9635 TPM (TT1.2/FW3.19)
    Accessory #3 ASUS OC Panel I (FW0501)
    Korth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Reputation
    152
    Posts
    2,719

    Haswell-E processors have 4 internal memory controllers (iMCs), each dedicated to addressing one channel (of up to 2 banks) of up to 16GB of DDR4-2133, each linked to the Intel Smart Cache (shared L3) and directly (through the multi-core L2) to one pair of CPU cores. There's really no way to dictate which iMC gets used for what unless you can somehow rewrite and reflash Intel's processor microcode; they are functionally treated as a single logical iMC. Suffice to say that sometimes data has to move from somewhere in one particular stick of RAM to core(s) which are linked to other particular sticks of RAM, sometimes while the L3 is already "full", and Intel has streamlined it surprisingly well, but moving data (electrical signals) from place to place to place across the processor's silicon die introduces a little latency (which all adds up quick) and generates a little more heat (which can cause significant thermal strain/flex on large dies when isolated circuit blocks operate at peak load while adjacent circuit blocks remain idle, even though overall package heat doesn't increase very much).

    The "top bin" Haswell-E part is the i7-5960X, it has a "full" die with no "dark silicon". (Although the very highest bin SR20x pieces were used for Haswell-EP E5-1680-3 parts.)
    The Haswell-E i7-5930K and i7-5820K parts have critical imperfections, so they were binned down with some "deactivated" cores/cache* but the remaining core/cache blocks are able to run at faster rated clocks and still fit within the total 140W TDP design target.
    * i7-5820K parts also have their integrated PCIe controllers arbitrarily locked down to 28 lanes, and Intel has been much criticized for this blatantly shameless marketing strategy.

    I explain all this here to emphasize how important the iMCs are and how much "work" gets put onto the processor when it has to address large-capacity and/or extreme-speed DDR4, all those bits multiplied by all those clocks equals a lot of volts and watts, and a part rated to address up to 64GB at 2133MTps suffers a lot of strain when pushed out of spec and forced to address 128GB at 3300MTps, it's working roughly 400% harder than designed, plus it's being forced to swallow volts and bleed temps which exceed the maximum designed thresholds. You'll benchmark amazing DDR4 bandwidths, your processor and motherboard will burn bright, but they'll also burn out while still very young. To my above post I add: overclocked components and settings which work one day may not work the next day.

    I increase my voltages reluctantly, in small increments, and only when necessary to maintain stable operation. In fact, I usually back off one or two notches to ease off the worst of the exponential damage, dramatically reduce overclocked power/heat levels but only incrementally reduce maximum overclocked performance. The "pro" overclockers often graph out clocks/voltages/temps for their parts and choose a "sweet spot" where they get "best" performance instead of "maximum" performance. Overclocked parts are categorically unreliable, and reliability is more important to some than to others (I'm much more stringent than most gamers, lol), but even the mightiest overclock isn't useful to anybody if it can hardly maintain enough uptime between BSoDs to watch a video or play a quick game.

    It turns out that I require huge memory bandwidth to keep my high-bandwidth BladeDrive and my Tesla operating at peak efficiency, they gotta constantly transfer and process and store an endless stream of data (made of puny objects) to pay for themselves, lol. But most of my machinery simply runs DDR3 or DDR4 at the maximum "official" rates supported by the processor or chipset, I'm not about benchmarking brag and swag, and most of my daily computing (or not-daily-anymore gaming) makes very little use of raw memory bandwidth. Fast memory is better than slow memory, but extremely fast memory is not worth sinking $$$$ into hardware which will die in a couple of years.
    Last edited by Korth; 01-23-2017 at 12:39 AM.

  6. #6
    ROG Guru: Black Belt Array Korth PC Specs
    Korth PC Specs
    MotherboardASUS X99 R5E (BIOS2101/1902)
    ProcessorHaswell-EP E5-1680-3 SR20H/R2 (4.4GHz)
    Memory (part number)Vengeance LPX 4x8GB SS DDR4-3000 (CMK32GX4M4C3000C15)
    Graphics Card #1NVIDIA Quadro GP100GL/16GB, 16xPCIe3, NVLink1 (SLI-HB)
    Graphics Card #2NVIDIA Quadro GP100GL/16GB, 16xPCIe3, NVLink1 (SLI-HB)
    Sound CardJDS Labs O2+ODAC (RevB), USB2 UAC1
    MonitorASUS PG278Q
    Storage #1Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SSDs, 4xSATA3 RAID0
    Storage #2Comay BladeDrive E28 3200GB SSD, 8xPCIe2
    CPU CoolerRaijintek NEMESIS/TISIS, AS5, 2xNH-A14
    CaseObsidian 750D (original), 6xNH-A14
    Power SupplyZalman/FSP ZM1250 Platinum
    Headset Pilot P51 PTT *modded*
    OS Arch, Gentoo, Win7x64, Win10x64
    Network RouterActiontec T3200M VDSL2 Gateway
    Accessory #1 TP-Link AC1900 Archer T9E, 1xPCIe
    Accessory #2 ASUS/Infineon SLB9635 TPM (TT1.2/FW3.19)
    Accessory #3 ASUS OC Panel I (FW0501)
    Korth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Reputation
    152
    Posts
    2,719

    Specific answers to specific questions:

    You should probably update your R5E firmware to BIOS 2201, generally considered the best BIOS version for Haswell-E processors. Backup all data first, especially if you have a RAID, lol. I'd usually advise not mucking around with what works unless it promises to actually fix something that's broken or it promises to add more of something you want. But in this instance it looks like it'll be the last and best BIOS ever available for your processor so you might as well enjoy whatever vaguely documented promises of "increased performance" and "increased stability" ASUS has offered.

    Not sure which voltages you should adjust, if any, lol it works now so why tempt fate? I learned almost everything I know about overclocking my R5E from reading the overclocking guides on the ROG forums.

    Just because someone else got their Corsair DDR4 to run at 3400 or 3600 doesn't guarantee you can do the same, even on the same hardware configuration.

    Early-release products usually have a wider (and more random) overclockable performance range beyond the top end. I have an ancient fresh-onto-the-market PNY GTX980 reference card which can run much, much faster than my last-gen factory-overclocked EVGA Classified GTX980 cards. Luck of the silicon lottery, unaffected by the factory binning processes which always develop after enough of the product exists on market that variances can be accurately measured.

    Today Corsair bins DDR4 rated for 3000, 3200, 3400, etc. It's pretty much assured that a 3200-rated stick won't perform at 3400 if a 3400-rated stick also exists - if it could, then why would Corsair cut it down? Don't believe the hype about how QA testing on each stick is too costly and time intensive to perform, that was true with later-gen DDR3 but today it is well worth the time because each rung up the binning ladder brings in an ever-increasing profit. People may have done statistical batch checking with manually-pulled random samples from each lot on silicon memory bins a few years ago ... today they run thousands of raw chips (as in, not just the sticks but the actual chips on them) through automated processes every hour and get neatly-tabulated lists of performance metrics for every piece as a matter of routine. I'm not even sure if human labour is still involved at any stage of the process, the chips are peeled off a roll of tape by robotic tools and they're passed from machine to machine at every step (to prevent contamination) until they're put into final customer packaging.
    Last edited by Korth; 01-23-2017 at 01:04 AM.

  7. #7
    ROG Guru: Brown Belt Array Brighttail PC Specs
    Brighttail PC Specs
    Laptop (Model)Asus G751JT
    MotherboardAsus x299 Rampage VI Extreme
    ProcessorIntel i9-7900x
    Memory (part number)Corsair Dominator Platinum SE 3200Mhz 4x8
    Graphics Card #1MSI GTX 1080TI
    MonitorAcer XB321HK (4k,IPS,G-sync)
    Storage #1Intel 900p (Boot) 2xSM961 (RAID 0) Games
    Storage #2Samsung 850 Pro 512GB - WD Black 4TB
    CPU CoolerCustom Water Cool
    CasePhanteks Enthoo Elite
    Power SupplyCorsair AX 1200i
    Keyboard Corsair Platinum 95
    Mouse Asus SPATHA
    Mouse Pad Corsair MM800
    Headset/Speakers Kanyo Y5
    OS Windows 10 64 bit
    Accessory #1 2 x Alphacool Full Copper Radiator 420mm/280mm
    Accessory #2 Monsoon MMRS reservoir w/ 2 x D5 Vario Pump
    Accessory #3 Monsoon Free Center Compression Fittings

    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Reputation
    33
    Posts
    1,336

    Quote Originally Posted by Korth View Post
    Specific answers to specific questions:

    You should probably update your R5E firmware to BIOS 2201, generally considered the best BIOS version for Haswell-E processors. Backup all data first, especially if you have a RAID, lol. I'd usually advise not mucking around with what works unless it promises to actually fix something that's broken or it promises to add more of something you want. But in this instance it looks like it'll be the last and best BIOS ever available for your processor so you might as well enjoy whatever vaguely documented promises of "increased performance" and "increased stability" ASUS has offered.

    Not sure which voltages you should adjust, if any, lol it works now so why tempt fate? I learned almost everything I know about overclocking my R5E from reading the overclocking guides on the ROG forums.

    Just because someone else got their Corsair DDR4 to run at 3400 or 3600 doesn't guarantee you can do the same, even on the same hardware configuration.

    Early-release products usually have a wider (and more random) overclockable performance range beyond the top end. I have an ancient fresh-onto-the-market PNY GTX980 reference card which can run much, much faster than my last-gen factory-overclocked EVGA Classified GTX980 cards. Luck of the silicon lottery, unaffected by the factory binning processes which always develop after enough of the product exists on market that variances can be accurately measured.

    Today Corsair bins DDR4 rated for 3000, 3200, 3400, etc. It's pretty much assured that a 3200-rated stick won't perform at 3400 if a 3400-rated stick also exists - if it could, then why would Corsair cut it down? Don't believe the hype about how QA testing on each stick is too costly and time intensive to perform, that was true with later-gen DDR3 but today it is well worth the time because each rung up the binning ladder brings in an ever-increasing profit. People may have done statistical batch checking with manually-pulled random samples from each lot on silicon memory bins a few years ago ... today they run thousands of raw chips (as in, not just the sticks but the actual chips on them) through automated processes every hour and get neatly-tabulated lists of performance metrics for every piece as a matter of routine. I'm not even sure if human labour is still involved at any stage of the process, the chips are peeled off a roll of tape by robotic tools and they're passed from machine to machine at every step (to prevent contamination) until they're put into final customer packaging.
    Once again thank you for your information. I have the capability to run my CPU to 4.5 Ghz stable with 1.38v. While I CAN do that, I feel that it is not a good trade off when I can do 4.4Ghz at roughly 1.32v with an adaptive + of .01.

    I am running the R5E10 so BIOS 2201 is not something I can use as it doesn't exist. I still have found that the last two BIOS updates for my R5E10 have rendered my RAM pretty much unstable without some voltage increase, so I'm currently happy with running version 902.

    Concerning my RAM, I understand why Corsair would bin their RAM to run at the top speed of whatever they market it at, but the RAM that I have is supposed to be their top of the line, special edition, only 500 sticks made. They market it as overclockable up to 3600MHz even though it is a 3200Mhz kit. I used to own a 2800MHz kit but didn't like running the 125 Mhz Block and could never get my CPU over 4.2 MHz because of it. Moving to the 3200MHz kit really made getting to 4.4GHz very easy with the same voltage I used at the 125Mhz block. I also upgraded for aesthetics as the Blackout version with red light bar really do go with my build but I digress.

    I'm quite happy with my overclock and my temps under load are under 70C. I was more curious with the possibility of squeezing a little bit more out of my RAM since Corsair itself has advertised/marketed that ability with this RAM kit.

    Thanks tho!
    Panteks Enthoo Elite / Asus x299 Rampage VI Extreme / Intel I9-7900X / Corsair Dominator RGB 3200MHz
    MSI GTX 1080 TI / 2x Intel 900p / Samsung 970 Pro 512GB
    Samsung 850 PRO 512GB / Western Digital Gold 8TB HD
    Corsair AX 1200i / Corsair Platinum K95 / Asus Chakram
    Acer XB321HK 4k, IPS, G-sync Monitor / Water Cooled / Asus G571JT Laptop

  8. #8
    ROG Enthusiast Array adamr PC Specs
    adamr PC Specs
    MotherboardAsus Maximus XI Formula
    Processori9 9900K 5Ghz - 1.28V
    Memory (part number)32GB GSkill RGB Trident Z
    Graphics Card #1Asus Geforce GTX 2080Ti OC
    MonitorAsus 34" ROG Swift PG348G
    Storage #1Samsung SSD 970 PRO 512GB
    Storage #2Samsung SSD 850 EVO 1TB
    CPU CoolerCorsair H115i Platinum
    CasePhanteks Evolv X
    Power SupplyCorsair AX1200i
    Keyboard Asus Claymore
    Mouse Razer Chroma Mamba
    Mouse Pad Corsair Big a55 Mat
    Headset/Speakers Logitech Z5500 5.1
    OS Windows 10 Pro
    Network RouterAmplifi
    adamr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Reputation
    10
    Posts
    57

    Thanks @Brighttail. Your posts have been very informative. Thing is in my situation running my 32gig kit at 1.2v and 2133mhz ( jdec), I'll still get a random memory management bsod. I've heard that sticks not run at their spec will give issues ... Is this true ? (Even if I run at 2133mhz )* *

    Secondly with what you stated above and getting a slight insight in the manufacture process finding a faulty dram stick seems highly unlikely as the automated process would definitely have picked this up . At present I'm busy testing stick at a time

  9. #9
    ROG Guru: Brown Belt Array Brighttail PC Specs
    Brighttail PC Specs
    Laptop (Model)Asus G751JT
    MotherboardAsus x299 Rampage VI Extreme
    ProcessorIntel i9-7900x
    Memory (part number)Corsair Dominator Platinum SE 3200Mhz 4x8
    Graphics Card #1MSI GTX 1080TI
    MonitorAcer XB321HK (4k,IPS,G-sync)
    Storage #1Intel 900p (Boot) 2xSM961 (RAID 0) Games
    Storage #2Samsung 850 Pro 512GB - WD Black 4TB
    CPU CoolerCustom Water Cool
    CasePhanteks Enthoo Elite
    Power SupplyCorsair AX 1200i
    Keyboard Corsair Platinum 95
    Mouse Asus SPATHA
    Mouse Pad Corsair MM800
    Headset/Speakers Kanyo Y5
    OS Windows 10 64 bit
    Accessory #1 2 x Alphacool Full Copper Radiator 420mm/280mm
    Accessory #2 Monsoon MMRS reservoir w/ 2 x D5 Vario Pump
    Accessory #3 Monsoon Free Center Compression Fittings

    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Reputation
    33
    Posts
    1,336

    Quote Originally Posted by adamr View Post
    Thanks @Brighttail. Your posts have been very informative. Thing is in my situation running my 32gig kit at 1.2v and 2133mhz ( jdec), I'll still get a random memory management bsod. I've heard that sticks not run at their spec will give issues ... Is this true ? (Even if I run at 2133mhz )* *

    Secondly with what you stated above and getting a slight insight in the manufacture process finding a faulty dram stick seems highly unlikely as the automated process would definitely have picked this up . At present I'm busy testing stick at a time
    These days getting a faulty stick is a rarity but it does happen. The only way you can test that is the old one stick at a time and testing them.

    Honestly, 2133 and 2400 speeds should give you zero issues. I would suggest going into BIOS and resetting it to optimal defaults, test at 2133 or 2400 (whichever your kits base freq is) and see how it goes. The problem in the end may be something with your Overclock.
    Panteks Enthoo Elite / Asus x299 Rampage VI Extreme / Intel I9-7900X / Corsair Dominator RGB 3200MHz
    MSI GTX 1080 TI / 2x Intel 900p / Samsung 970 Pro 512GB
    Samsung 850 PRO 512GB / Western Digital Gold 8TB HD
    Corsair AX 1200i / Corsair Platinum K95 / Asus Chakram
    Acer XB321HK 4k, IPS, G-sync Monitor / Water Cooled / Asus G571JT Laptop

  10. #10
    ROG Enthusiast Array adamr PC Specs
    adamr PC Specs
    MotherboardAsus Maximus XI Formula
    Processori9 9900K 5Ghz - 1.28V
    Memory (part number)32GB GSkill RGB Trident Z
    Graphics Card #1Asus Geforce GTX 2080Ti OC
    MonitorAsus 34" ROG Swift PG348G
    Storage #1Samsung SSD 970 PRO 512GB
    Storage #2Samsung SSD 850 EVO 1TB
    CPU CoolerCorsair H115i Platinum
    CasePhanteks Evolv X
    Power SupplyCorsair AX1200i
    Keyboard Asus Claymore
    Mouse Razer Chroma Mamba
    Mouse Pad Corsair Big a55 Mat
    Headset/Speakers Logitech Z5500 5.1
    OS Windows 10 Pro
    Network RouterAmplifi
    adamr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Reputation
    10
    Posts
    57

    Quote Originally Posted by Brighttail View Post
    These days getting a faulty stick is a rarity but it does happen. The only way you can test that is the old one stick at a time and testing them.

    Honestly, 2133 and 2400 speeds should give you zero issues. I would suggest going into BIOS and resetting it to optimal defaults, test at 2133 or 2400 (whichever your kits base freq is) and see how it goes. The problem in the end may be something with your Overclock.
    yeah everything is at default speeds (optimised defaults) and the system would still bsod. I've returned the kit to the retailer for testing and hope to hear from them soon about a replacement. Will post back if it is indeed a faulty kit

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •