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  1. #1
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    Switch from Windows to Linux

    Anyone switched from Windows to Linux? I'm thinking of making the jump, as I've just heard many good things about Linux, and I'm a bit unhappy with Windows. Would like to know what others have done.

  2. #2
    ROG Guru: Black Belt Array Korth PC Specs
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    How much do you know about linux? There's lots of linux out there, many distros to choose from. Most distros support Live USB, so you can actually boot and run the entire OS off a USB flash drive - it's not a bad idea to try several different distros out before actually choosing which one you'll properly install onto a fixed system drive. Linux Mint is a good distro for beginners. You should of course install some sort of dual-boot or multi-boot so that the user can choose which operating system boots up each time (linux, Windows, etc), and many distros (like Mint) include the needed bootloader software in their setups.

    Most linux distros are built on the same operating system "core" (kernel) then differentiated by software add-ons, extras, configurations, and extensions. The differences between major linux families often amount to their policies about legal/licensing details, version control, and package management. Some distros strictly maintain fully open source development on single every line of code, a few distros are fully commercialized, most distros fall somewhere in between to allow some balance between open collaboration and private development. Some distros focus on fully stable and debugged OS components which have proven themselves over rigidly controlled periods, other distros embrace the latest-and-greatest new betas, most fall somewhere in the middle. Package management is basically whatever mechanism is used to install and uninstall things along with "software update" functions and a sort of "app store" for getting more (free) software - different distros implement such stuff different ways. And there's always distros inspired by some individual or team which has decided to dev some flavour of linux "perfect" for their specific purpose(s), most of these rogue distros amount to little but now and then they evolve into large linux communities of their own.

    Linux vs Windows:
    most linux operating systems are completely free, there are never any hassles involving product activation or software keys locked onto specific hardware
    most linux software packages are completely free, there are linux equivalents for every major Windows commercial software product
    linux is actively and aggressively supported, millions of people code linux (for love), but only thousands of people code Windows (for money)
    linux operating systems and software packages have been compiled for multiple hardware platforms, it's easy to migrate all your stuff between PC and iOS and Android
    linux can run almost all existing Windows software through emulators (like WINE)
    linux supports a wide variety of file systems, Windows basically offers only one (plus the few early versions needed for compatibility)

    linux has limited DirectX support (many people are always working on porting DirectX but Microsoft owns DirectX and doesn't allow their proprietary code to be duplicated, and existing DX emulations/workarounds are too slow to provide impressive DX performance in games)
    linux doesn't (and never will) have a whole lot of awesome games, especially not FPS-based games, game devs focus on Windows (and DirectX) because that's where all the money is
    linux is not supported by all hardware manufacturers, some devices just don't work properly on linux (many people work on this too, but it's more hit-or-miss)

    Don't be discouraged or prejudiced by "free". It's still "professional" grade, slick, clean, elegant, efficient. In many instances the "free" softwares are actually better than counterparts sold by Microsoft, Apple, Adobe, Corel, etc.

    Some Windows-to-linux users are confused by the interface. Windows is all built around a single GUI embedded in the OS, it's organized the way Microsoft designed it to be and can be user-customized only in ways Microsoft allowed it to be. linux doesn't strictly have a native GUI, but these days every distro provides several GUIs to select from, and sometimes distros organize/customize their GUIs in ways which look wildly different from each other. Customized in ways far, far more than just changing desktop background, icons, cursor animations, and where the taskbar sits. Don't be confused, just navigate around and figure out what's where, an easy learning curve, no more difficult than moving from Windows to new GUI on a Mac or a smartphone.
    Last edited by Korth; 02-06-2017 at 11:33 PM.

  3. #3
    iron man Array kkn's Avatar
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    i dont know enny thing bout linux, and i am using linux mint on my HTPC, its windows based like setup, you have apps you can add too if so wanted.
    you have VLC for those who want it, kodi is an option,++++.
    download linucmint iso on to a usb drive and boot it from the USB stick and you can test it that way whit out instaling it.
    mint is is souly made up by ppl donating monny so they can work on it.
    the mint 18.1 cinnamon i sout now, there is a few versions of it and i have the cinnamon one.
    heres the direct link to the dowload page -> https://linuxmint.com/download.php

  4. #4
    ROG Guru: Brown Belt Array sk2play's Avatar
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    I quad boot 4 linux distros (Ubuntu, Mint, Zorin, Solydk) and experimented many others on my linux box. If you can't experiment with additional PC, I will suggest to install Win10 first. If you're a gamer however dual or multi booting is very simple with the four Linux distros I have mentioned. If you want to game on Linux, Solydk had Steam pre-installed but oddly was the weakest on sound. I like all the four choices I experimented with. Always install the 64bit versions. The distros also all have Mozilla Firefox and Libre Office (compatible with MS Office every version) pre-installed.
    Last edited by sk2play; 02-07-2017 at 10:52 PM.
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  5. #5
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    Thanks for the replies everyone! I don't know an awful lot about Linux, but I've got a lot of info to sift through I guess being a Windows user most of my life, it's not a change I make suddenly :P I think it all started when I read this 1&1 guide, as the article just brought to life a lot of things I wanted in an OS. I imagine that Linux could overtake Windows as a better solution in maybe 10-15 years. Has anyone been disappointed with Linux, on the other hand?

  6. #6
    ROG Guru: Black Belt Array Korth PC Specs
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    Korth's Avatar
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    It is a change to make suddenly! Run some linuxes off a Live USB, no need to do a fixed install. It'll never happen while you sit trapped in Windows.

  7. #7
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    Fair point. I'm slowly transitioning Thanks for all the input

  8. #8
    ROG Guru: Blue Belt Array jab383 PC Specs
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    Maybe not switch. If you're apprehensive about abandoning the familiar windows, try installing a dual boot. I put Linux Mint on top of Win7 and the dual boot worked first try.

  9. #9
    ROG Enthusiast Array XZEMi's Avatar
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    I think the closest linux distro you can get to a windows 7 like experience is Linux Mint. The closest you can get to windows 7 with a huge support crowd would be ubuntu linux. But the downside last I checked no directx 12 native support. And if you game well torchlight 2 works on steam with linux but some other games support last I checked its hit or miss. Linux is a great platform but rather than working with it you may find yourself searching around to get it to do what you want initially.

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