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  1. #1
    ROG Member Array Saltyfish PC Specs
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    Some findings after 30+ oc attempts

    1. Apparently vdroop is common among all rog boards. So set LLC to 5 improves stability. Remember to lower your voltage for about 2 units (25mv x 2) because it will automatically give more volts when needed.
    2. If the system fails it doesn't always means that you need to put more volts in as other intel chips do. Try not to let the volts go over 1.46 helps too.
    3. If you want to OC some ram thats not fully compatible, try to increase the timing and increase soc voltage (don't go too far because soc volts increases heat A LOT)*
    4. Try to have a fresh installed OS would help stability. I did not do this but once i killed all the background my system passes all the stress test *for some reason.*

    My system is now stable on 4.0g@1.395v (I think it only needs 1.375 but meh cant be bothered), and ram 2666 16-16-16-35 2t 1.35v, soc volt 1.

  2. #2
    Tech Marketing Manager HQ Array Raja@ASUS's Avatar
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    Hi,

    Just for sake of clarification, Vdroop is common on every power supply that is used on any motherboard. Setting a higher LLC doesn't make things more stable. It just increases the amount of applied voltage in relation to what you have set in the UEFI. You can achieve the same level of stability with a lower LLC and by setting the UEFI voltage higher. The sag will be greater at lower LLC levels, but the actual voltage required for stability under load is exactly the same. There's more to Vdroop, but that subject is more complex.

    At higher levels of LLC, you end up with more overshoot past the applied voltage. Some measurements here; different board, but the concept doesn't change (same laws of physics apply). Scroll down to the scope images: https://rog.asus.com/forum/showthrea...-measured-quot


    -Raja

  3. #3
    ROG Member Array Saltyfish PC Specs
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raja@ASUS View Post
    Hi,

    Just for sake of clarification, Vdroop is common on every power supply that is used on any motherboard. Setting a higher LLC doesn't make things more stable. It just increases the amount of applied voltage in relation to what you have set in the UEFI. You can achieve the same level of stability with a lower LLC and by setting the UEFI voltage higher. The sag will be greater at lower LLC levels, but the actual voltage required for stability under load is exactly the same. There's more to Vdroop, but that subject is more complex.

    At higher levels of LLC, you end up with more overshoot past the applied voltage. Some measurements here; different board, but the concept doesn't change (same laws of physics apply). Scroll down to the scope images: https://rog.asus.com/forum/showthrea...-measured-quot


    -Raja
    Thanks for the information. I tried on both my m8h and c6h i find that high LLC gives me the closest volts to the set volts in bios. Also if I set my LLC to 3 or lower the vdroop is kind of dramatic that it drops all the way to 1.325v with pre set 1.4v

  4. #4
    ROG Guru: Yellow Belt Array MNMadman PC Specs
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saltyfish View Post
    Thanks for the information. I tried on both my m8h and c6h i find that high LLC gives me the closest volts to the set volts in bios. Also if I set my LLC to 3 or lower the vdroop is kind of dramatic that it drops all the way to 1.325v with pre set 1.4v
    Also make sure you are using the most accurate readings. The real-time BIOS readings are not always accurate. Monitoring programs in Windows are not always accurate.

    HWinfo64 has been putting out almost daily updates, and finally has extremely accurate voltage readings with new newest 5.47-3118 beta version (source) on the C6H board. They are readings directly from the VRMs. I found that the BIOS and previous monitoring programs were wrong as far as my voltages.
    Last edited by MNMadman; 03-24-2017 at 07:55 PM.

  5. #5
    ROG Member Array Saltyfish PC Specs
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    Quote Originally Posted by MNMadman View Post
    Also make sure you are using the most accurate readings. The real-time BIOS readings are not always accurate. Monitoring programs in Windows are not always accurate.

    HWinfo64 has been putting out almost daily updates, and finally has extremely accurate voltage readings with new newest 5.47-3118 beta version (source) on the C6H board. They are readings directly from the VRMs. I found that the BIOS and previous monitoring programs were wrong as far as my voltages.
    I found ai suite the closest to hwinfo. Havn't checked for updates though. I will go look it up now.

  6. #6
    Tech Marketing Manager HQ Array Raja@ASUS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saltyfish View Post
    Thanks for the information. I tried on both my m8h and c6h i find that high LLC gives me the closest volts to the set volts in bios. Also if I set my LLC to 3 or lower the vdroop is kind of dramatic that it drops all the way to 1.325v with pre set 1.4v
    The droop doesn't really matter per say. One just has to set things up correctly.

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