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  1. #1291
    ROG Guru: Orange Belt Array
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    Quote Originally Posted by red773 View Post
    EK's facebook said that the cable position in the production model will be different to allow all the dims to fit.
    That is great to know that EK is aware of the issue and fixing it!

    I am not even going to use the "RAMPAGE VI" name plate on their clear-nickel monoblock though. Once you remove the black name plate, the entire monoblock is a slab of clear acrylic, and the "Republic of Gamers" block right below it is bright enough to glow its RGB light directly into the monoblock from the bottom. I will remove the 4.0"-long RGB strip from the name plate and mount it to the top of the monoblock, with the LEDs facing downward into the monoblock, and use an iridescent glass diffuser plate along the top edge of the monoblock to diffuse the LED dots from view, and then the RGB cable just routes along the top edge of the mobo towards the RGB_HEADER1 header on the upper-right corner. Arranged this way, I can use Aura to light up the "Republic of Gamers" block one color along the bottom of the monoblock, and have the RGB striip along the top of the monoblock a different color. For example, if the "Republic of Gamers" block was colored red from below the monoblock and the RGB strip was colored purple along the top of the monoblock, you may be able to get a color gradient effect going across the monoblock if you use clear fluid since Aura treats each RGB header as a separate programmable color zone. Pastels would block out much of the RGB lighting on the clear-nickel monoblock.

  2. #1292
    ROG Guru: White Belt Array smithkid PC Specs
    smithkid PC Specs
    Laptop (Model)Surface Pro 3
    MotherboardROG Rampage VI Extreme
    Processor7900X
    Memory (part number)F4-3200C16Q-32GTZR
    Graphics Card #1Asus ROG GTX 1080 STRIX O8G
    Graphics Card #2Asus ROG GTX 1080 STRIX O8G
    Monitor7 various
    Storage #1Samsung 960 Pro 1TB
    Storage #2WD 1TB Blue M.2 SSD
    CPU CoolerAquacomputer NEXT cuplex kryos vision cu/cu
    CaseLianli PC-T70FX includes T70-1
    Power SupplyCorsair HX1200i
    Keyboard FILCO Majestouch Convertible 2 BT/USB 104 Key - Cherry Brown
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    Quote Originally Posted by DragonPurr View Post
    Yep, surgical hemostats have a multitude of uses in electronics repair. Another indispensable tool is a magnetic ratcheting screwdriver. And here in the U.S., the very best magnetic ratcheting screwdriver is made by Snap-On Tools. I have both their shorter and longer ratcheting screwdriver. Their magnets are strong, they can use various other 100-piece or 200-piece bit driver sets, they are not cheap, but they last forever:

    https://store.snapon.com/Standard-Ha...r-P634146.aspx
    https://store.snapon.com/Standard-Ha...r-P634148.aspx

    So here is a very bizarre, but very true, story about using surgical hemostats for PC repair. Yes, it's off-topic, but I think it's funny...

    During my second year of full-time study at UT-Austin during 1983, IBM starting interviewing on-campus for part-time positions as electronics technicians at their PC manufacturing plant that they were rapidly expanding at their big IBM campus in north Austin. I had purple-dyed hair and dragon tattoos at the time, I knew that IBM had an ultra-conservative culture, but I applied anyway. I was offered an electronics technician job and started working at IBM 20 to 30 hours every week, and the pay was excellent. I did not receive IBM's full employee benefits such as medical insurance, but I was eligible for their very generous 50%-off employee discount to buy IBM PCs.

    IBM used high-speed state-of-the-art robotics to assemble the mobos used on the original PC, PC/XT, and (later in 1984) PC/AT. That was followed by two technician stations where some components such as expansion slot sockets were hand-assembled, followed by a QC technician station that looked for mobo defects using high-quality magnifying lamps. The mobos were then passed to me at the final QA station before being sent to the wave-soldering machines. We had very high quality standards, there were never any production quotas, and each assembly and inspection station took as long as needed to ensure maximum mobo quality. At the same time that I was helping IBM build PCs as a UT-Austin student, Michael Dell was building PCs in his UT-Austin dorm room and selling them as his "PC's Limited" small business.

    Anyhoo, a UT-Austin co-ed was seated at the QA station next to me. I noticed that she was using a straight hemostat to help with the repairing and adjusting of components, straightening bent IC chip pins, etc. She was actually using the hemostat as a roach clip for her, ummm, recreational herbs, and she brought it into work to help with fixing mobo components. So I asked my IBM manager if they could buy hemostats for every QC and QA technician to help with fixing and building PC mobos.

    All the IBM managers dressed very conservatively, wearing heavily starched white shirts, and navy blue tie and slacks. But the UT-Austin students that they hired sometimes had tattoos and dyed hair. It was the heyday of the punk and new-wave '80s, after all. Many of us students were a very close-knit group at the IBM plant, and we would go club-hopping and listen to live music after work on Friday nights. On the following two school years, I was working part-time at IBM's development office at the same Austin campus, doing systems programming in C code and 8088 assembly language.

    So that was how IBM supplied all their PC technicians with hemostats to assist with PC repair - all because a UT-Austin co-ed started using her hemostat roach clip at her QA station, and I asked my manager to buy hemostats for all of us to use. LOL!! True story!
    I was at UC Davis at the Veterinary School in the 70's and we in Small Animal Surgery "lost" hundreds of hemostats for R clips. By the way my photo was of alligator forceps not hemostats which I originally used for removing grass seeds from dogs ears but now they are used for retrieving nuts, washers and screws that have been dropped into irretrievable places.

  3. #1293
    ROG Guru: Orange Belt Array
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    Quote Originally Posted by smithkid View Post
    I was at UC Davis at the Veterinary School in the 70's and we in Small Animal Surgery "lost" hundreds of hemostats for R clips. By the way my photo was of alligator forceps not hemostats which I originally used for removing grass seeds from dogs ears but now they are used for retrieving nuts, washers and screws that have been dropped into irretrievable places.
    Yep, hemostats have the adjustable locking notches on their handles, which makes them more useful than forceps in situations where you need to clamp something. I have also used a locked hemostat as a "third hand" or also a "fourth hand" to hold onto something when working on stuff, or to clamp two objects together while I let the adhesive cure between the objects. Forceps and tweezers are also very useful, but hemostats have even more uses.

  4. #1294
    ROG Guru: Brown Belt Array tistou77 PC Specs
    tistou77 PC Specs
    MotherboardRampage VI Extreme Encore
    Processor10980XE @4.6Ghz
    Memory (part number)G.Skill Trident Z RGB Royal 4x8Gb @4000 C16
    Graphics Card #1EVGA RTX 2080ti XC Ultra
    Sound CardXonar Phoebus
    MonitorDell U2721DE
    Storage #1Intel Optane 905P PCIe
    Storage #2Samsung 980 Pro
    CPU CoolerWatercooling
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    No availability date yet for europe ?
    Sorry for my english


    Case: Lian Li A77F
    MB: Rampage VI Extreme Encore
    CPU: i9 10980XE
    RAM: G.Skill Trident Z RGB Royal 4x8Gb @4000 C16
    GPU: EVGA RTX 2080ti XC Ultra
    PSU: Seasonic Prime Ultra Titanium 1000W
    OS: Intel Optane 905P PCIe
    DATA: Samsung 980 Pro
    SOUND: Asus Xonar Phoebus

  5. #1295
    ROG Enthusiast Array Franziska PC Specs
    Franziska PC Specs
    MotherboardRampage V Extreme
    Processor5930K
    Memory (part number)Corsair DP DDR4 2800 16GB (4x4)
    Graphics Card #1GTX 980
    Sound CardFostex HP-A3 (USB)
    MonitorNEC PA272W
    Storage #1Samsung 850 Pro 512GB
    Storage #2Seagate Constellation ES.3 4TB (2x RAID0)
    CPU CoolerAquacomputer Kryus Cuplex (Custom WC Loop)
    CaseCorsair 750D
    Power SupplySeasonic Platinum 1000W
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    Quote Originally Posted by tistou77 View Post
    No availability date yet for europe ?
    I was told mid to end of October.

  6. #1296
    ROG Guru: Brown Belt Array tistou77 PC Specs
    tistou77 PC Specs
    MotherboardRampage VI Extreme Encore
    Processor10980XE @4.6Ghz
    Memory (part number)G.Skill Trident Z RGB Royal 4x8Gb @4000 C16
    Graphics Card #1EVGA RTX 2080ti XC Ultra
    Sound CardXonar Phoebus
    MonitorDell U2721DE
    Storage #1Intel Optane 905P PCIe
    Storage #2Samsung 980 Pro
    CPU CoolerWatercooling
    CaseLian Li A77F
    Power SupplySeasonic Prime Ultra Titanium 1000W
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    it's long

    Thanks
    Sorry for my english


    Case: Lian Li A77F
    MB: Rampage VI Extreme Encore
    CPU: i9 10980XE
    RAM: G.Skill Trident Z RGB Royal 4x8Gb @4000 C16
    GPU: EVGA RTX 2080ti XC Ultra
    PSU: Seasonic Prime Ultra Titanium 1000W
    OS: Intel Optane 905P PCIe
    DATA: Samsung 980 Pro
    SOUND: Asus Xonar Phoebus

  7. #1297
    New ROGer Array
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    Quote Originally Posted by DragonPurr View Post
    Yep, surgical hemostats have a multitude of uses in electronics repair. Another indispensable tool is a magnetic ratcheting screwdriver. And here in the U.S., the very best magnetic ratcheting screwdriver is made by Snap-On Tools. I have both their shorter and longer ratcheting screwdriver. Their magnets are strong, they can use various other 100-piece or 200-piece bit driver sets, they are not cheap, but they last forever:

    https://store.snapon.com/Standard-Ha...r-P634146.aspx
    https://store.snapon.com/Standard-Ha...r-P634148.aspx

    So here is a very bizarre, but very true, story about using surgical hemostats for PC repair. Yes, it's off-topic, but I think it's funny...

    During my second year of full-time study at UT-Austin during 1983, IBM starting interviewing on-campus for part-time positions as electronics technicians at their PC manufacturing plant that they were rapidly expanding at their big IBM campus in north Austin. I had purple-dyed hair and dragon tattoos at the time, I knew that IBM had an ultra-conservative culture, but I applied anyway. I was offered an electronics technician job and started working at IBM 20 to 30 hours every week, and the pay was excellent. I did not receive IBM's full employee benefits such as medical insurance, but I was eligible for their very generous 50%-off employee discount to buy IBM PCs.

    IBM used high-speed state-of-the-art robotics to assemble the mobos used on the original PC, PC/XT, and (later in 1984) PC/AT. That was followed by two technician stations where some components such as expansion slot sockets were hand-assembled, followed by a QC technician station that looked for mobo defects using high-quality magnifying lamps. The mobos were then passed to me at the final QA station before being sent to the wave-soldering machines. We had very high quality standards, there were never any production quotas, and each assembly and inspection station took as long as needed to ensure maximum mobo quality. At the same time that I was helping IBM build PCs as a UT-Austin student, Michael Dell was building PCs in his UT-Austin dorm room and selling them as his "PC's Limited" small business.

    Anyhoo, a UT-Austin co-ed was seated at the QA station next to me. I noticed that she was using a straight hemostat to help with the repairing and adjusting of components, straightening bent IC chip pins, etc. She was actually using the hemostat as a roach clip for her, ummm, recreational herbs, and she brought it into work to help with fixing mobo components. So I asked my IBM manager if they could buy hemostats for every QC and QA technician to help with fixing and building PC mobos.

    All the IBM managers dressed very conservatively, wearing heavily starched white shirts, and navy blue tie and slacks. But the UT-Austin students that they hired sometimes had tattoos and dyed hair. It was the heyday of the punk and new-wave '80s, after all. Many of us students were a very close-knit group at the IBM plant, and we would go club-hopping and listen to live music after work on Friday nights. On the following two school years, I was working part-time at IBM's development office at the same Austin campus, doing systems programming in C code and 8088 assembly language.

    So that was how IBM supplied all their PC technicians with hemostats to assist with PC repair - all because a UT-Austin co-ed started using her hemostat roach clip at her QA station, and I asked my manager to buy hemostats for all of us to use. LOL!! True story!
    I had never thought to use hemostats for pc building. I don't have the extensive pc history that many of you have, but I was going to the junkyard to pull heater cores out of wrecked cars back in the late 90's for watercooling and have been building ever since. I can't count the times those hemostats would have come in handy over the years. Or a nice set of screwdrivers. But wow, those are spendy! I'll have to look if you can get a nice set of bits in a good case. The one I bought at Lowes doesn't have a good case to hold the bits.

    I missed what chip most of you plan to use in the board. Isn't the full line of i9's out next week? The 7920x from Silicon Lottery looks great, but the costs just get so high. Would be super cool to have 12 or more cores running above 4.5ghz. But I'll have to wait to see what the coffee lake/z370 boards are like before I decide. But sure enjoy watching this thread!

  8. #1298
    ROG Guru: Brown Belt Array Brighttail PC Specs
    Brighttail PC Specs
    Laptop (Model)Asus G751JT
    MotherboardAsus x299 Rampage VI Extreme
    ProcessorIntel i9-7900x
    Memory (part number)Corsair Dominator Platinum SE 3200Mhz 4x8
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    MonitorAcer XB321HK (4k,IPS,G-sync)
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    Quote Originally Posted by DashTrash View Post
    I had never thought to use hemostats for pc building. I don't have the extensive pc history that many of you have, but I was going to the junkyard to pull heater cores out of wrecked cars back in the late 90's for watercooling and have been building ever since. I can't count the times those hemostats would have come in handy over the years. Or a nice set of screwdrivers. But wow, those are spendy! I'll have to look if you can get a nice set of bits in a good case. The one I bought at Lowes doesn't have a good case to hold the bits.

    I missed what chip most of you plan to use in the board. Isn't the full line of i9's out next week? The 7920x from Silicon Lottery looks great, but the costs just get so high. Would be super cool to have 12 or more cores running above 4.5ghz. But I'll have to wait to see what the coffee lake/z370 boards are like before I decide. But sure enjoy watching this thread!
    Wow.. 12 cores all running at 4.7Ghz I got my normal off the shelf 7900x on its way. I'll play with it in my rig and see how high it can go on a normal AIO before I decide to have it delidded or not.
    Panteks Enthoo Elite / Asus x299 Rampage VI Extreme / Intel I9-7900X / Corsair Dominator RGB 3200MHz
    MSI GTX 1080 TI / 2x Intel 900p / Samsung 970 Pro 512GB
    Samsung 850 PRO 512GB / Western Digital Gold 8TB HD
    Corsair AX 1200i / Corsair Platinum K95 / Asus Chakram
    Acer XB321HK 4k, IPS, G-sync Monitor / Water Cooled / Asus G571JT Laptop

  9. #1299
    New ROGer Array
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brighttail View Post
    Wow.. 12 cores all running at 4.7Ghz I got my normal off the shelf 7900x on its way. I'll play with it in my rig and see how high it can go on a normal AIO before I decide to have it delidded or not.
    I'd love to see some posts on what you get with your chip! I think I'd end up going with the 7820x from Silicon Lottery. More cores would be cool, but I don't need them. The clock speed it more important for me. That's why I think I'll have to wait and see what the 8700k can do before I decide. I'll also be interested to see how much better the R6E is on average over competing boards.

  10. #1300
    ROG Enthusiast Array Franziska PC Specs
    Franziska PC Specs
    MotherboardRampage V Extreme
    Processor5930K
    Memory (part number)Corsair DP DDR4 2800 16GB (4x4)
    Graphics Card #1GTX 980
    Sound CardFostex HP-A3 (USB)
    MonitorNEC PA272W
    Storage #1Samsung 850 Pro 512GB
    Storage #2Seagate Constellation ES.3 4TB (2x RAID0)
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    Quote Originally Posted by tistou77 View Post
    it's long

    Thanks
    Sadly yes but that's what both caseking and mindfactory told me on the phone. It could be sooner but that's not expected as no dates were given by their distributors yet. I still have my 6950X/R5E10 in the meanwhile, not really in a rush here.

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