Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    ROG Member Array yountmg PC Specs
    yountmg PC Specs
    MotherboardASUS Maximus VIII Ranger ROG
    ProcessorIntel(R) Core(TM) i7-6700K CPU @ 4.00GHz
    Memory (part number)PVE416G213C4KGY
    Graphics Card #1MSI GeoForce GTX 1060 X 6G Gaming
    Sound CardROG SupremeFX 2015 on-board integrated
    MonitorSamsung SyncMaster 204b
    Storage #1Samsung V-NAND SSD 850 EVO 250GB
    Storage #2WDC WD1003FZEX-00MKA0
    CPU CoolerCorsair H100i v2
    CaseTT Suppressor T31
    Power SupplyCorsair RM850i
    Mouse EEK EEK with extra long tail
    Mouse Pad obsolete since lasers
    Headset/Speakers Yamaha ha ha
    OS Windows 10 Pro version 1607

    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Reputation
    10
    Posts
    16

    ASUS CPU Load Line Calculation, Which is which?

    I have a new "ASUS ROG Maximus VIII Ranger" with a Intel I7 6700K.

    To fix an occasional BSOD CLOCK_WATCHDOG_TIMER on CIV 5; windowsforum said t0 update the bios from 1601 t0 3401.

    I noticed however CPU voltage has went way up?

    I am only attempting a modest OC of 4200 Mhz.

    The manual states that CPU Load Line Calculation goes from Level 1 to Level 8 or 0% to 100%.
    The BIOS states that the CPU Load Line Calculation goes from Level 1 to Level 7 or 100% to 15%.

    The word respectively is noticebly absent from both write ups.
    Web sites never correlate low and high, 0% and 100% to the ASUS Level 1 and Level (7/8?)?

    Motherboard manufacturers apparently differ on which Level is low or high, so understandably use words like low, medium and never use high.

    I changed it from Level 5 to Level 4 and it did seem to go up, pushing 1.489v under stress rather than 1.385v.

    I wish I knew if level 4 is indeed lower or higher than level 5?
    Apparently ASUS removed Level 8 from the BIOS, so maybe level 8 was 100%????

  2. #2
    ROG Guru: Brown Belt Array davemon50 PC Specs
    davemon50 PC Specs
    Laptop (Model)Asus G752VY-DH72 (17") and Asus G752VT-DH74 (17")
    MotherboardAsus ROG LGA2011-v3 Rampage V Edition 10, x99 EATX
    ProcessorIntel Core i7-6950X Extreme 10-core 25MB Cache 3.0 GHz
    Memory (part number)Corsair Vengeance LPX Red DDR4 DRAM 64GB-4x16 3333 (CMK64GX4M4B3333C16R)
    Graphics Card #1Sapphire Nitro Radeon R9 Fury 4GB HBM Backplate
    Graphics Card #2Sapphire Nitro Radeon R9 Fury 4GB HBM Backplate
    Sound CardAsus SupremeFX Hi-Fi Audio DAC
    Monitor(2) Dell UltraSharp U2515H 25-inch monitors
    Storage #1(4) SSD's - Samsung 960 & 970 1TB M.2, Intel 535 480G, Intel 510 250G
    Storage #2(3) HDD's - Western Digital Caviar Black 2TB 3.5-in SATA III 64MB Cache
    CPU CoolerCorsair Hydro Series H80
    CaseCorsair Obsidian Series 650D Black, ATX, Mid Tower
    Power SupplyCorsair Digital AXi-Series AX1200i (1200W) 80+ Platinum Rating
    Keyboard Logitech Wireless K360
    Mouse Logitech Wireless MX Anywhere 2
    Headset HyperX Cloud II
    OS Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit
    davemon50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Reputation
    48
    Posts
    1,126

    OK this is not a direct answer to your voltage question (I don't know the answer, sorry), but I have played many hundreds if not a couple thousand hours of Civ 5, and had a lot of instability issues, total lockups, etc. I found that overclocking of the GPU was the source of it all. I didn't set it back to stock, but after reducing graphics OC settings iteratively for that particular game I finally got to the point where everything finally ran stably. I couldn't find this advice on any forums or on Steam, but it solved the problems. This problem did/does not occur with Civ 6. Maybe that's something you can try? Hope that helps.
    Davemon50

  3. #3
    ROG Guru: Brown Belt Array MeanMachine PC Specs
    MeanMachine PC Specs
    Laptop (Model)I enjoy my wife
    MotherboardCVI HERO + CVII Hero Wifi
    ProcessorRyzen 7 1800X + 2700X
    Memory (part number)CMD16GX4M2B3000C15 + F4-3200C14D-16GTZR
    Graphics Card #1EVGA GTX980 SC for CVFZ
    Graphics Card #2EVGA GTX 1080 hybrid
    Graphics Card #3GTX 770 for phys x
    Sound CardMB
    MonitorHP w2408h
    Storage #1Samsung 970 EVO 500GB M.2
    Storage #2Samsung 840EVO 500GB and 960 M.2 pro
    CPU CoolerCorsair H105, H110 and H115i
    CaseCorsair 750D and 780T
    Power SupplyCorsair AX-1200i and Antec 850 pro platinum
    Keyboard Logitech K800
    Mouse Razer Mamba
    Headset Corsair Vengeance 2100
    OS W7 Ultimate 64bit and W10 pro 64bit
    Network RouterNetcom Wireless NF18ACV
    MeanMachine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Reputation
    126
    Posts
    1,686

    This is not going to answer your question completely however my understanding of LLC (Load Line Calibration) is thus:

    LLC is to defeat Vdroop so they introduced LLC to tackle Vdroop which applies additional voltage to the CPU. It is to ensure a more stable vCore under load and minimize the gap between CPU voltage in idle and load. LLC is important when going for that little extra in your CPU OC.
    I have found that using LLC in the final phase of your OC is beneficial with demanding CPUs that have high TDP draw. I don't feel it being necessary to increase LLC beyond either side of center in your LLC scale. Not too hIgh and not too low depending on TDP.

    LLC varies between MB manufacturers as to what settings are available for LLC and "CPU Current Capability". Some as a % and some from 1-8. Level 5 is higher than 4 at least it is with my MB. Level 8 is for LN2 OCing.

    If you updated your Bios recently then your on default settings.
    Last edited by MeanMachine; 07-08-2017 at 03:31 AM.
    We owe our existence to the scum of the earth, Cyanobacteria

    My System Specs:

    MB:ASUS ROG Crosshair VII Hero/WiFi GPU:EVGA GTX 1080 sc PSU:Corsair AX-1200i
    CPU:
    AMD R7 2700X Cooler: Corsair Hydro H115i Case: Corsair Carbide 780t

    Memory:G.Skill TridentZ F4-3200C14D-16GTZR SSD:Samsung 500GB 960 EVO M.2



  4. #4
    ROG Guru: Black Belt Array Korth PC Specs
    Korth PC Specs
    MotherboardASUS X99 R5E (BIOS2101/1902)
    ProcessorHaswell-EP E5-1680-3 SR20H/R2 (4.4GHz)
    Memory (part number)Vengeance LPX 4x8GB SS DDR4-3000 (CMK32GX4M4C3000C15)
    Graphics Card #1NVIDIA Quadro GP100GL/16GB, 16xPCIe3, NVLink1 (SLI-HB)
    Graphics Card #2NVIDIA Quadro GP100GL/16GB, 16xPCIe3, NVLink1 (SLI-HB)
    Sound CardJDS Labs O2+ODAC (RevB), USB2 UAC1
    MonitorASUS PG278Q
    Storage #1Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SSDs, 4xSATA3 RAID0
    Storage #2Comay BladeDrive E28 3200GB SSD, 8xPCIe2
    CPU CoolerRaijintek NEMESIS/TISIS, AS5, 2xNH-A14
    CaseObsidian 750D (original), 6xNH-A14
    Power SupplyZalman/FSP ZM1250 Platinum
    Headset Pilot P51 PTT *modded*
    OS Arch, Gentoo, Win7x64, Win10x64
    Network RouterActiontec T3200M VDSL2 Gateway
    Accessory #1 TP-Link AC1900 Archer T9E, 1xPCIe
    Accessory #2 ASUS/Infineon SLB9635 TPM (TT1.2/FW3.19)
    Accessory #3 ASUS OC Panel I (FW0501)
    Korth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Reputation
    152
    Posts
    2,719

    https://linustechtips.com/main/topic...-the-i7-6700k/
    http://www.tweaktown.com/guides/7481...de/index5.html
    https://www.msi.com/blog/why-llc-is-...n-overclocking

    You can always set higher VCore so the CPU remains stable when voltage drops and current increases under load. Until you reach a point where low-load VCore is too high, so you instead use Load Line Calibration (LLC). LLC adaptively compensates for fluctuations ("droops") in VCore voltages.

    Different motherboard manufacturers implement LLC differently. Usually in a consistent fashion across all their motherboards, although LLC qualities often vary across different motherboard chipsets or even different motherboard variants/models.
    LLC is basically software running in firmware, it depends on the qualities and specifications of (mostly VRM) hardware components, it depends on timings and responses of running (ASIC/PCH) firmware/software components, it depends on the cleverness and efficiencies of design and layout for everything working together. LLC is very easy to implement ... but not very easy to implement well.

    LLC (with little or no user control) is often embedded on low-end motherboards with low-end VRMs. And (with some or total user control) on high-end motherboards with high-end VRMs to allow the user to overclock multiple component parameters far beyond "recommended" or "rated" values. Misconfigured LLC settings reduce system stability.

    End of story is that exactly what LLC is and exactly what LLC does and exactly how LLC works on any given motherboard has to be learned from the manufacturer. There's some comprehensive Maximus VIII / i7-6700K overclocking guides in these forums (and others, lol) which discuss LLC settings in some detail, but it's just one of those things that ASUS likes to be deliberately vague and cryptic about (partly to thwart evil competitors and partly because ASUS actually has no way of knowing exactly what quirks and qualities apply to your particular motherboard and processor parts).

  5. #5
    ROG Member Array yountmg PC Specs
    yountmg PC Specs
    MotherboardASUS Maximus VIII Ranger ROG
    ProcessorIntel(R) Core(TM) i7-6700K CPU @ 4.00GHz
    Memory (part number)PVE416G213C4KGY
    Graphics Card #1MSI GeoForce GTX 1060 X 6G Gaming
    Sound CardROG SupremeFX 2015 on-board integrated
    MonitorSamsung SyncMaster 204b
    Storage #1Samsung V-NAND SSD 850 EVO 250GB
    Storage #2WDC WD1003FZEX-00MKA0
    CPU CoolerCorsair H100i v2
    CaseTT Suppressor T31
    Power SupplyCorsair RM850i
    Mouse EEK EEK with extra long tail
    Mouse Pad obsolete since lasers
    Headset/Speakers Yamaha ha ha
    OS Windows 10 Pro version 1607

    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Reputation
    10
    Posts
    16

    Eureaka, its working again

    The Patriot Viper 2133Mhz DDR4 were not working @2133Mhz or 2400Mhz with the 3401 auto settings.

    note: Help pages always tell you to get a stable CPU overclock before OCing the RAM.

    I do not think its possible to get a stable CPU OC if the RAM is already failing.

    I suspect that the BIOS 1601 was marginal when running Patriot Viper DDR4 on Auto settings.
    I paid a pro 85 dollars to set this stuff up, stupid of me; he just loaded defaults.

    I finally passed a stress test using BIOS 3401 by setting CPU VCIO and System Agent to 1.1.
    I also upped DRAM voltage from 1.2 to 1.2012.

    Vcore is set to auto, runing @1.378v & 30C and stressing out at @1.489v & 70C.

    When the memory was set on auto, stress tests failed; but I was able run windows sort of; with vcore manually set @1.27v.
    The stress test would some times complete with max values @1.385v & 60C! This is better than 1.489v & 70C.

    I think that going manual with offsets will lower the temperature and voltage spikes.

    Davemon50 ::
    Yes, I agree.
    Works for Real Bench Luxmark OpenCL Test also.
    Debug mode disables Graphics card Overclocking.

    MeanMachine::
    So all I need to do is find and read a story on a Maximus VIII LN2 build and read it!
    Thanks, I will look into that. I wasn't to interested before because I can't afford to go LN2, but I am pretty sure they are maxing out LLC; if they actually mention the settting I will know. I just want the vcore to behave reasonably for 4200 Mhz.

  6. #6
    ROG Member Array yountmg PC Specs
    yountmg PC Specs
    MotherboardASUS Maximus VIII Ranger ROG
    ProcessorIntel(R) Core(TM) i7-6700K CPU @ 4.00GHz
    Memory (part number)PVE416G213C4KGY
    Graphics Card #1MSI GeoForce GTX 1060 X 6G Gaming
    Sound CardROG SupremeFX 2015 on-board integrated
    MonitorSamsung SyncMaster 204b
    Storage #1Samsung V-NAND SSD 850 EVO 250GB
    Storage #2WDC WD1003FZEX-00MKA0
    CPU CoolerCorsair H100i v2
    CaseTT Suppressor T31
    Power SupplyCorsair RM850i
    Mouse EEK EEK with extra long tail
    Mouse Pad obsolete since lasers
    Headset/Speakers Yamaha ha ha
    OS Windows 10 Pro version 1607

    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Reputation
    10
    Posts
    16

    I purchased new RAM, Patriot RAM

    I upped system agent and VCCIO voltage and it seemed to be working and then everything started failing randomly.

    The post codes reported weirdness like CPU initialization failure and memory not installed and SSD boot drive failures.

    I have suspected bad memory every since I purchased the system so I ran MemTest64+ again and this time it reported a lot of failures.

    I purchased Corsair Dominator DDR4 3000 MHz CMD16GX4M2B3000C15; ASUS recommended where as Patriot was not.
    Either the Patriot ram was bad from the start or not compatible with this system and eventually failed hard.

    The new ram uses higher voltages, of course.

    DRAM is 1.353, CPU system agent is 1.2 and VCCIO 1.125. These values were set by the BIOS.

  7. #7
    Tech Marketing Manager HQ Array Raja@ASUS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Reputation
    164
    Posts
    7,454

    On the ASUS boards, lower LLC values result in 'more droop', while higher values result in less (well, there's more to it than that, but this isn't the medium to discuss such things). It has been that way for as long as I can remember.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •