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  1. #11
    ROG Guru: Black Belt Array Korth PC Specs
    Korth PC Specs
    MotherboardASUS X99 R5E (BIOS2101/1902)
    ProcessorHaswell-EP E5-1680-3 SR20H/R2 (4.4GHz)
    Memory (part number)Vengeance LPX 4x8GB SS DDR4-3000 (CMK32GX4M4C3000C15)
    Graphics Card #1NVIDIA Quadro GP100GL/16GB, 16xPCIe3, NVLink1 (SLI-HB)
    Graphics Card #2NVIDIA Quadro GP100GL/16GB, 16xPCIe3, NVLink1 (SLI-HB)
    Sound CardJDS Labs O2+ODAC (RevB), USB2 UAC1
    MonitorASUS PG278Q
    Storage #1Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SSDs, 4xSATA3 RAID0
    Storage #2Comay BladeDrive E28 3200GB SSD, 8xPCIe2
    CPU CoolerRaijintek NEMESIS/TISIS, AS5, 2xNH-A14
    CaseObsidian 750D (original), 6xNH-A14
    Power SupplyZalman/FSP ZM1250 Platinum
    Headset Pilot P51 PTT *modded*
    OS Arch, Gentoo, Win7x64, Win10x64
    Network RouterActiontec T3200M VDSL2 Gateway
    Accessory #1 TP-Link AC1900 Archer T9E, 1xPCIe
    Accessory #2 ASUS/Infineon SLB9635 TPM (TT1.2/FW3.19)
    Accessory #3 ASUS OC Panel I (FW0501)
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    My apologies. I'd (mistakenly) thought undervolting = underclocking. That's how it works with the sorts of part I work with, anyhow, although everything is still kept within a subset of rated spec.

    From what I've read it seems that undervolting is basically a form of overclocking, with the objective of increasing power and thermal efficiencies intead of performances. It varies from part to part although a (conservative) margin is designed into every part to ensure better stability and reliability.

    I see the merit of this approach on a mobile device. I happen to hate BSoDs so much that I wouldn't personally undervolt my parts, if anything I'd rather overpower them a little to reduce operational faults wherever possible, but undervolting appears to be an appealing option for many others.
    "All opinions are not equal. Some are a very great deal more robust, sophisticated and well supported in logic and argument than others." - Douglas Adams

    [/Korth]

  2. #12
    ROG Enthusiast Array Sheltem PC Specs
    Sheltem PC Specs
    Laptop (Model)ASUS G752VS-GB139T
    MotherboardIntel® CM236 Express Chipset
    ProcessorIntel Core i7-6820HK (2.7GHz @ 3.4GHz -80.1mV adaptive, 8MB Cache, 4 cores, HT)
    Memory (part number)4x Samsung 16GB DDR4-2400MHz (M471A2K43BB1-CRC)
    Graphics Card #1ASUS NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (1493/2077/1695 MHz, 8GB GDDR5 [Samsung])
    Monitoracer Predator X34 (Curved 34", UWQHD 3440x1440@100Hz, IPS, G-Sync)
    Storage #1Toshiba NVMe THNSN5512GPU7 TO (SSD, 512 GB)
    Storage #2Samsung 850 EVO 1TB (SSD, SATA3)
    Keyboard Logitech G910 (Orion Spark)
    Mouse Logitech PRO
    Mouse Pad Logitech G440
    Headset/Speakers Edifier S330D
    OS Windows 10 Pro (64-bit)
    Network RouterLinksys WRT1900AC (Stock OS)
    Accessory #1 TP-LINK SG1005D

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    Quote Originally Posted by Korth View Post
    My apologies. I'd (mistakenly) thought undervolting = underclocking. That's how it works with the sorts of part I work with, anyhow, although everything is still kept within a subset of rated spec.

    From what I've read it seems that undervolting is basically a form of overclocking, with the objective of increasing power and thermal efficiencies intead of performances. It varies from part to part although a (conservative) margin is designed into every part to ensure better stability and reliability.

    I see the merit of this approach on a mobile device. I happen to hate BSoDs so much that I wouldn't personally undervolt my parts, if anything I'd rather overpower them a little to reduce operational faults wherever possible, but undervolting appears to be an appealing option for many others.
    As with any form of open-ended performance optimization, this is a two phase process. From a theoretical point of view, you keep on testing (both via synthetic stress tests and everyday usage) until you find stable values for your hardware. After that, it's done - no BSoDs. From a practical point of view, you decide when to end the first phase, based on nothing more than empirical observations after applying an own-designed testing methodology.

    As @Bran187 explained, it might seem not worth the hassle if your computer operates as designed, since marginally lower power draw, heat output and extended lifespan will hardly make any difference, while the search for the optimal configuration will take an unknown amount of time.

    On the other hand, if the lower heat output means no more thermal throttling, that does make a huge difference and is well worth the cost, even if it means running into BSoDs from time to time until you finally get to a really stable configuration.
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  3. #13
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    Tested this configuration, specially the xTU new approach.

    I can confirm that it did nothing on my GL702VM model.
    Resuming so far the biggest changes were the 305 Bios update which took over the stutters, althought without bigger temperature impacts.
    I assume the biggest changes on temperature will also only provided by drilling holes on bottom.

    Tested all possible configurations with Turbo Boost Enabled as I don´t see the reason to disable on a powerfull computer like this one. This should be a gaming laptop so as long as stutters are just a few or inexistent it is ok for me.
    Proceadures to get rid of 5ºC /10ºC on a gaming laptop which hits in general the 80ºC´s is ridiculous. Specially now with the 305 Bios which eliminated the major stutters and freezes.

  4. #14
    ROG Enthusiast Array Sheltem PC Specs
    Sheltem PC Specs
    Laptop (Model)ASUS G752VS-GB139T
    MotherboardIntel® CM236 Express Chipset
    ProcessorIntel Core i7-6820HK (2.7GHz @ 3.4GHz -80.1mV adaptive, 8MB Cache, 4 cores, HT)
    Memory (part number)4x Samsung 16GB DDR4-2400MHz (M471A2K43BB1-CRC)
    Graphics Card #1ASUS NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (1493/2077/1695 MHz, 8GB GDDR5 [Samsung])
    Monitoracer Predator X34 (Curved 34", UWQHD 3440x1440@100Hz, IPS, G-Sync)
    Storage #1Toshiba NVMe THNSN5512GPU7 TO (SSD, 512 GB)
    Storage #2Samsung 850 EVO 1TB (SSD, SATA3)
    Keyboard Logitech G910 (Orion Spark)
    Mouse Logitech PRO
    Mouse Pad Logitech G440
    Headset/Speakers Edifier S330D
    OS Windows 10 Pro (64-bit)
    Network RouterLinksys WRT1900AC (Stock OS)
    Accessory #1 TP-LINK SG1005D

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kompensan View Post
    Proceadures to get rid of 5ºC /10ºC on a gaming laptop which hits in general the 80ºC´s is ridiculous.
    Even though the sentence is ambigously worded, let me present a clear example:

    95-96 C vs 92 C v 90 C

    95-96+: computer shuts down without warning
    92: constant heavy throttling as temperature re-reaches 92+
    90: computer working as designed

    So simply by cutting down temperatures by 5-6 C it is possible to achieve flawless performance vs random shutdowns + constant stuttering.
    He who invokes history is always secure.
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  5. #15
    New ROGer Array
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nevortic View Post
    Hi guys, I leave the video because now I have no time to write the whole process but as soon as I have time I will write all about that post.

    - ACTIVE Turbo Boost.
    - You do not need to have a cooling pad (unless you want it colder).
    - New stable GPU curve.

    VIDEO LINK : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SMU5VU_P9-4

    I hope you are useful and that it also works for you.
    Write any question.
    ------------
    If there is any mistake I correct as soon as I have time.
    Thanks for sharing the info. I got my 502vm 2weeks ago and it was like a molten lava for the first 30min of gaming. Avg Core temp was around 93c... and I was about to return this sexy laptop. However, I did some research and it seems that the major 7700HQ laptops (Alienware R3 , Asus Rog, MSI) all reported to have 90c ~ 100c overheating problem.

    Intel XTU really saved our laptops from exploding lol..and saved the hassles of RMA, I mean no sane ppl would game on an expensive laptop with 97c for extended periods of time. However, under ambient temperture of about 24c, even with -135mV and turboboost off, my avg core temp reaches around 84c, and the surface of my laptop (slightly above the keys) is super hot. Also...occasionally I can hear slight cracking sound due to the thermal expansion/compression of the material of the laptop surface....

    I really hope there is a way to reduce the core temp. to around 70c underload....like my i5 6300HQ....man, I'd really picked core i5 skylake over the i7 Kabylake....just for the lower temp.

  6. #16
    ROG Enthusiast Array Sheltem PC Specs
    Sheltem PC Specs
    Laptop (Model)ASUS G752VS-GB139T
    MotherboardIntel® CM236 Express Chipset
    ProcessorIntel Core i7-6820HK (2.7GHz @ 3.4GHz -80.1mV adaptive, 8MB Cache, 4 cores, HT)
    Memory (part number)4x Samsung 16GB DDR4-2400MHz (M471A2K43BB1-CRC)
    Graphics Card #1ASUS NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 (1493/2077/1695 MHz, 8GB GDDR5 [Samsung])
    Monitoracer Predator X34 (Curved 34", UWQHD 3440x1440@100Hz, IPS, G-Sync)
    Storage #1Toshiba NVMe THNSN5512GPU7 TO (SSD, 512 GB)
    Storage #2Samsung 850 EVO 1TB (SSD, SATA3)
    Keyboard Logitech G910 (Orion Spark)
    Mouse Logitech PRO
    Mouse Pad Logitech G440
    Headset/Speakers Edifier S330D
    OS Windows 10 Pro (64-bit)
    Network RouterLinksys WRT1900AC (Stock OS)
    Accessory #1 TP-LINK SG1005D

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    Quote Originally Posted by Izuizu View Post
    I really hope there is a way to reduce the core temp. to around 70c underload....like my i5 6300HQ....man, I'd really picked core i5 skylake over the i7 Kabylake....just for the lower temp.
    Mobile Intel processors are designed to operate at temperatures of 80+C for arbitrary amounts of time. As long as you don't run into the 92+ region where it may throttle or even shutdown (96+), you are all good. There isn't any significant difference between operating at 50-60 C and 80-89 C, as far as the mobile processors are concerned.
    He who invokes history is always secure.
    The dead will not rise to witness against him.

    You can accuse them of any deeds you like.
    Their reply will always be silence.

  7. #17
    ROG Enthusiast Array
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    Quote Originally Posted by Izuizu View Post
    Thanks for sharing the info. I got my 502vm 2weeks ago and it was like a molten lava for the first 30min of gaming. Avg Core temp was around 93c... and I was about to return this sexy laptop. However, I did some research and it seems that the major 7700HQ laptops (Alienware R3 , Asus Rog, MSI) all reported to have 90c ~ 100c overheating problem.

    Intel XTU really saved our laptops from exploding lol..and saved the hassles of RMA, I mean no sane ppl would game on an expensive laptop with 97c for extended periods of time. However, under ambient temperture of about 24c, even with -135mV and turboboost off, my avg core temp reaches around 84c, and the surface of my laptop (slightly above the keys) is super hot. Also...occasionally I can hear slight cracking sound due to the thermal expansion/compression of the material of the laptop surface....

    I really hope there is a way to reduce the core temp. to around 70c underload....like my i5 6300HQ....man, I'd really picked core i5 skylake over the i7 Kabylake....just for the lower temp.
    In practice I have the active turbo boost. I just changed the parameters of the max watt that the boost boost can use ... I dropped it from 45W to 18W ... now the pc is below the 80 degrees but seems that the performance are the same than before.

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