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  1. #1
    ROG Member Array DirtTrash78 PC Specs
    DirtTrash78 PC Specs
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    Configuring a "Dedicated IP" from service provider?? GT-AC5300

    I have now owned this router for a few months and after some configuring I was able to get everything working flawless. Recently we switched services to "business services" because we got tired of usage caps. Now we are unlimited data usage through cable internet, SWEET!!

    Our provider gave us a "dedicated IP" address that came with our business account and I have no clue how to set it up. And the provider obviously doesn't know anything. Any and all help will be appreciated.

    And I hope the moderators delete ALL off topic comments. Thanks in advance. And please keep it to how-to answers.

    -Semper Fi
    Last edited by DirtTrash78; 11-28-2017 at 07:48 PM.
    Stay Low Move Fast Kill First Die Last...OOORAH!!!

  2. #2
    Banned Array JustinThyme PC Specs
    JustinThyme PC Specs
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    What is WAN on your router connected to?
    The term dedicated IP is irrelevant and should translate into static IP.
    With most providers you have to connect to the internet with their modem or router and the static IP is set up there on the wan connection. You need to have the IP address from the ISP before you can set it up. Then its simply a matter of reconfiguring the WAN connection from DHCP to static and entering the numbers they give you.

    I have Verizon and while I can connect my router directly to the fiber OND if I do I lose the program guide and DVR functionality of my set top boxes.
    So I set up a DMZ on the Verizon router and chose a number on the high end of the DHCP Pool. DMZ gives that IP a direct connection past ISP router. For example a IP of 192.168.1.253 entered as a DMZ. Then on my router I set up its WAN as static of 192.168.1.153. After to avoid conflict you will have to change your DHCP pool if your router LAN to something like 192.168.20.1 and all your network will be connecting to a DHCP server of 192.168.20.1

    These are just arbtrarty number working around the default. I suggest to get off of default and make your own numbers up.

    What with the Semper Fi? Your not a Jarhead are you?

  3. #3
    New ROGer Array megwenda PC Specs
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    Apologies if I oversimplify anything below, but I do not know your network skills. I do not have the router, but I downloaded the manual from ASUS.. may be slightly different from the hardcopy you received with the device

    I am also assuming that the static IP address has not yet been implemented in the router, as you say the provider doesn't know how to do it in your router (but unless they are a hopeless ISP, they will know the basic steps that have to be accomplished)

    A static IP address is only of interest to you if you wish to offer resources from your Local Area Network (LAN) to the users on the Internet. Basically, it gives an IP address that users (and hackers) can use to go direct to your 'service', ie a public web server, webcams or similar things.

    If you do not have any desire or requirement to offer these, then simply file the IP address for future use, and continue as you are.

    There is another way to achieve the same effect without using a static IP address, and that is to use DDNS which is described in your manual, and does not need any coordination with the ISP.

    OK, if you are still reading, then maybe you do want to use the static IP address

    As JustinThyme says, the IP address is installed on the WAN interface of the router, however I would disagree that it is simply a matter of reconfiguring from dhcp to static and adding the static IP address. Reason for saying this is that this has to be closely coordinated with the provider, as he has to make similar changes to the 'other' side of the connection (ie, to the WAN router that you are connected to) AT THE SAME TIME, else the network routing will not work.

    Assuming you can coordinate with the provider, then you do as JustinThyme say, configure the wan interface to use static IP addresses, define the IP address, network and gateway address and the DNS server (the provider must provide all four values, although you could also use a public DNS server such as googles 8.8.8.8).

    So, in section 4.5.1 point 2, you would change WAN Connection Type to Static IP,...... and here the manual fails as it assumes you chose Automatic IP, and so does not describe the screens which appear next. I found this faq which should be similar.

    So, you can now code in the static IP address, network (probably 255.255.255.252) the gateway and also the provider recommended DNS address

    If the provider has made his changes on the other side of the cable, you should now get a network connection, and your router is known on the outside by the static IP address.

    You now need to decided what to do about security, and what devices to expose...

    Hope this helps
    Last edited by megwenda; 11-29-2017 at 09:59 AM.

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