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Thread: Pg27uq

  1. #1361
    ROG Guru: White Belt Array
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    Quote Originally Posted by bubba123 View Post
    don't have a problem with that on my 55 inch lg oled tv
    You dont now. If you play games alltime with the same HUD you will have in the future

  2. #1362
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    Guess what, i hate blooming

    But still not yet received the screen.

  3. #1363
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevinmaster5000 View Post
    To PG27UQ owners, the monitor has 6 GameVisual modes, for stuff like FPS,RTS,Scenary, sRGB, etc. What mode would you use universally? I really dont like switching back and forth through modes. Do you guys switch through modes? If not, what mode would you recommend for permanant usage. There's no standard mode.
    Racing mode is the same as Standard. "Standard" mode means the monitor uses its full colour gamut and ideally does not transform colour values. This mode must be calibrated with a colorimeter and requires a colour aware workflow.

    In SDR mode you can either:
    1) Use Racing mode with custom RGB values, use DisplayCAL to create a custom ICC profile, and use DisplayCAL Profile Loader to preserve the calibration (gamma curve). This gives you accurate wide gamut colour in colour aware applications like Firefox and Photoshop. However, virtually every other application including the desktop will be oversaturated since they render in sRGB and the monitor will map it to a wider gamut. Some games like Source engine games have a -nogammaramp option which lets DisplalyCAL profile loader preserve the calibrated gamma curve, resulting in better shadow detail, but the colours will still be oversaturated since the engine is not colour aware.

    2) Use sRGB mode and choose the default sRGB ICC profile in Windows. This makes use of the monitor's accurate factory calibration. Everything will be accurate but limited to the sRGB colour space. The monitor will also restrict the brightness to ~100 nits. I suggest getting used to this brightness in SDR because it will look the same as HDR and only highlights will be above 100 nits.

    In HDR mode:
    HDR10 is an absolute standard - there is only one correct gamma (the PQ curve), one correct colour space (BT.2020), and one correct brightness (diffuse white is 100 nits). The desktop and non-HDR aware applications will continue to use the 2.2 gamma curve and sRGB colour space resulting in an incorrect image.

    Note that 8-bit / 10-bit and RGB / YCbCr have nothing to do with the above. When the signal is YCbCr, the display probably uses the BT.1886 gamma curve commonly used with Rec.709 video, which is slightly different from the sRGB 2.2 gamma curve commonly used with an RGB signal. This is the reason for the black crush in 144 Hz YCbCr422 mode. The monitor is actually behaving accurately, but the desktop and applications are incorrectly using the 2.2 gamma curve. Since this system wide problem will never be fixed in the foreseeable future, I presume ASUS decided to use the 2.2 gamma curve for YCbCr in the updated firmware so that desktop applications look correct.
    Last edited by kathampy; 07-10-2018 at 12:04 PM.

  4. #1364
    ROG Guru: Yellow Belt Array kevinmaster5000 PC Specs
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    Quote Originally Posted by kathampy View Post
    Racing mode is the same as Standard. "Standard" mode means the monitor uses its full colour gamut and ideally does not transform colour values. This mode must be calibrated with a colorimeter and requires a colour aware workflow.

    In SDR mode you can either:
    1) Use Racing mode with custom RGB values, use DisplayCAL to create a custom ICC profile, and use DisplayCAL Profile Loader to preserve the calibration (gamma curve). This gives you accurate wide gamut colour in colour aware applications like Firefox and Photoshop. However, virtually every other application including the desktop will be oversaturated since they render in sRGB and the monitor will map it to a wider gamut. Some games like Source engine games have a -nogammaramp option which lets DisplalyCAL profile loader preserve the calibrated gamma curve, resulting in better shadow detail, but the colours will still be oversaturated since the engine is not colour aware.

    2) Use sRGB mode and choose the default sRGB ICC profile in Windows. This makes use of the monitor's accurate factory calibration. Everything will be accurate but limited to the sRGB colour space. The monitor will also restrict the brightness to ~100 nits. I suggest getting used to this brightness in SDR because it will look the same as HDR and only highlights will be above 100 nits.

    In HDR mode:
    HDR10 is an absolute standard - there is only one correct gamma (the PQ curve), one correct colour space (BT.2020), and one correct brightness (diffuse white is 100 nits). The desktop and non-HDR aware applications will continue to use the 2.2 gamma curve and sRGB colour space resulting in an incorrect image.

    Note that 8-bit / 10-bit and RGB / YCbCr have nothing to do with the above. When the signal is YCbCr, the display probably uses the BT.1886 gamma curve commonly used with Rec.709 video, which is slightly different from the sRGB 2.2 gamma curve commonly used with an RGB signal. This is the reason for the black crush in 144 Hz YCbCr422 mode. The monitor is actually behaving accurately, but the desktop and applications are incorrectly using the 2.2 gamma curve. Since this system wide problem will never be fixed in the foreseeable future, I presume ASUS decided to use the 2.2 gamma curve for YCbCr in the updated firmware so that desktop applications look correct.
    Thank you for such an informative post, I learned alot of it. One question I have is regarding your first point. If the monitor is already calibrated out of the box, wouldn't there be no need to calibrate the monitor? Particularly if racing mode is equivalent to standard mode.

  5. #1365
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevinmaster5000 View Post
    Thank you for such an informative post, I learned alot of it. One question I have is regarding your first point. If the monitor is already calibrated out of the box, wouldn't there be no need to calibrate the monitor? Particularly if racing mode is equivalent to standard mode.
    Standard / Racing mode is an undefined colour space - it's whatever the panel is physically capable of. The factory calibration for this mode will just linearly expand the input to the panel's native colour space. Since it does not have a label like DCI-P3 or AdobeRGB, you cannot use it out of the box with a default ICC profile - it must be profiled with a colorimeter.

    The sRGB mode will exactly map the input to sRGB on the panel, so you can use the default sRGB ICC profile. If a monitor has an AdobeRGB mode, you can use it with the default AdobeRGB profile, but non-colour aware applications will still be incorrect because they only output sRGB.

  6. #1366
    ROG Guru: Yellow Belt Array kevinmaster5000 PC Specs
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    Quote Originally Posted by kathampy View Post
    Standard / Racing mode is an undefined colour space - it's whatever the panel is physically capable of. The factory calibration for this mode will just linearly expand the input to the panel's native colour space. Since it does not have a label like DCI-P3 or AdobeRGB, you cannot use it out of the box with a default ICC profile - it must be profiled with a colorimeter.

    The sRGB mode will exactly map the input to sRGB on the panel, so you can use the default sRGB ICC profile. If a monitor has an AdobeRGB mode, you can use it with the default AdobeRGB profile, but non-colour aware applications will still be incorrect because they only output sRGB.
    Thank you again for a great reply. This becomes a complication for someone like me who does not own a colorimeter. I had originally thought factory calibration was good enough, and provided a close to optimal performance. Then what mode or setting adjustments would you recommend for someone like me (that plays most type of games with or without HDR, likes beautiful graphics, and loves netflix lol) and does not have a colorimeter. I was hoping I could have set a mode I can just leave and forget. Any recommendation?
    Last edited by kevinmaster5000; 07-10-2018 at 06:08 PM.

  7. #1367
    ROG Guru: Yellow Belt Array Legolas PC Specs
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    Check if the game supports HDR. If not, I turn it off in WIndows and benchmark and playing games works
    Sincerely,
    Legolas

  8. #1368
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    Quote Originally Posted by KOT0005 View Post
    gotta turn on displayport deepsleep. Turn off windows fast start.
    thank you turning on deep sleep worked. I had turned it off because every now and then I was having issues with 1 of my monitors. Running in Nvidia surround and when I would turn my system on sometimes 1 monitor wouldn’t wake out of sleep or even get a signal. I would have to unplug power to monitor and then plug back in and set up surround all over again

  9. #1369
    ROG Guru: Yellow Belt Array kevinmaster5000 PC Specs
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    So I just got my PG27UQ today. I am using a dual monitor set up with a 1080p TN panel I have had for the last 6 years. While this monitor absolutely blows it away, the TN panels (VG278H) seems to have whiter whites. I am genuinely concerned about it. It's tiring for my eyes to see such a drastic difference. The camera captures the difference pretty accurately.

    Any ideas what to do? (PG27UQ left vs VG278H right)

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	36965797_1938368912861357_1011592676564271104_n.jpg 
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ID:	74674

  10. #1370
    ROG Guru: Yellow Belt Array btrach144 PC Specs
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    Graphics Card #2NVIDIA Titan X (Pascal)
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevinmaster5000 View Post
    So I just got my PG27UQ today. I am using a dual monitor set up with a 1080p TN panel I have had for the last 6 years. While this monitor absolutely blows it away, the TN panels (VG278H) seems to have whiter whites. I am genuinely concerned about it. It's tiring for my eyes to see such a drastic difference. The camera captures the difference pretty accurately.

    Any ideas what to do? (PG27UQ left vs VG278H right)

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	36965797_1938368912861357_1011592676564271104_n.jpg 
Views:	5 
Size:	193.1 KB 
ID:	74674
    your $2,000 monitor is factory calibrated with a $7,000 meter. Your $200 monitor is not. Buy a calibration meter for your cheap monitor and use something like Calman RGB.

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